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Documents with reference to the Sino-Russian dispute, 1929
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Documents with reference to the Sino-Russian dispute, 1929 - Image 27. 1929. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4392/show/4342.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1929). Documents with reference to the Sino-Russian dispute, 1929 - Image 27. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4392/show/4342

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Documents with reference to the Sino-Russian dispute, 1929 - Image 27, 1929, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4392/show/4342.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Documents with reference to the Sino-Russian dispute, 1929
Publisher Far Eastern Information Bureau
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Nanjing, China
Date 1929
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • International relations
  • History
  • Communism
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
  • China
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Extent 66 pages; illustrations, facs.; 19 cm
Original Item Location DS740.5.R8C53 1929
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304537~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 27
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_4442076_026.jpg
Transcript 2. THE SUBTERFUGE IN THE STATEMENT OF THE CONSPIRATORS: All those who took part in the complot stated that they came to the consulate for the purpose of changing their passports, or for visiting friends, or for making enquiries. No one would acknowledge that he had something to do with the conference. The discrepancy in their statements may be summed up as follows: First, if they had no secret meeting, all the doors would not be so tightly closed as to shut out all admittance during office hours, especially in the time when there were many people applying for passports. This eccentric aspect can never be seen in government offices in any country in the world.' Second, if they had no seditious schemes in view, the conspirators, more than eighty in number, would not have crowded themselves into a locked-up cell which was neither an office room nor a club. Third, the timidity and self-contradiction of the conspirators was plainly evident when none of them dared to acknowledge that they were having a conference when it was quite reasonable for them to state that they had an ordinary meeting. Fourth, that the meeting was prearranged was undeniable from the fact that the participants were most of them important members of the communist party, such as the Consul-General of Mukden and the representatives from Khabarovska and that these comploters arrived at the same time although they did not live at the same distance from Harbin, where the conference was held. Fifth, all the arrested persons stated that they came to the consulate for passports. But it was quite suspicious that they all arrived at about 1 p.m. and nearly none of them was a plain citizen but of some standing. It is quite improbable for such personages to come to the consulate at the same time if there were no prearrangement. Finally, if they were really coming to the consulate for passports, it is highly dubious why none of them had got a passport or other certificates when they had waited at the consulate for more than one hour from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. (It was after 2 p.m. when the police entered the premises.) From these considerations we may safely draw the conclusion that the statements of these arrested persons were entirely fabulous and evasive. That the falsehood of their statements was beyond doubt is evident from the fact that when the police had arrested the conspirators the consul-general urgently enjoined them not to say too much and that with this injunction the comploters all complied. 21