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Fascism, its history and significance
Image 31
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W., L.. Fascism, its history and significance - Image 31. 1924. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 26, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4149/show/4135.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

W., L.. (1924). Fascism, its history and significance - Image 31. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4149/show/4135

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

W., L., Fascism, its history and significance - Image 31, 1924, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 26, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4149/show/4135.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Fascism, its history and significance
Creator (Local)
  • W., L.
Publisher The Plebs
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London, England
Date 1924
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Fascism
Subject.Name (Local)
  • W., L.
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 38 pages; 24 cm
Original Item Location JC481.F3 1924
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304502~S5
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 31
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_25194896_030.jpg
Transcript FASCISM 29 exploitation and the aims of the Fascist imperialists are still soaring. The Adriatic and even the whole of the Mediterranean are claimed as the proper preserves of Italian commerce—much to the horror of The Times, and the leading French papers, which warn the Italians in avuncular terms against such exaggerated claims. Inside the Fascist Party, the dissension between the " old " or " dissident" elements and the orthodox supporters of Mussolini grows rather than lessens. This dissension is a fairly straightforward one and is between the agrarian elements still in the Party and the Fascists proper. The presence of agrarians has always been a thorn in Mussolini's side, and the powers of censorship have been applied to criticisms raised by the dissidents against the Government. A large concession of petroliferous land has recently been made to the American Sinclair Syndicate. The dissident Fascists in their journal IlNuova Paese have attacked this policy on nationalist grounds, but further criticism has now been prohibited by the Government. The policy is equally distasteful to the Nationalists and another break in the bourgeois front is made. The quarrels in the bourgeois camp have recently come to a head as a result of the murder of the Socialist Giacomo Matteotti. There is no doubt that this was an act of the utmost unwisdom. It had the result of uniting all the elements of the opposition against the Government. In spite of Mussolini's policy of " moderation," his personal attitude towards violence was highly compromising, even five days before this murder. Speaking in the Chamber in reply to criticisms raised by the Communist Gennari, the Premier pleasantly remarked :—" What you want is a bullet in your neck. We have the courage to see that this is done, and we shall do it. We have still time, and we shall act sooner than you expect. . . ." The extremists were shouting for a victim and Mussolini gave way. Matteotti was selected. It is not difficult to see why the choice fell on Matteotti. He was a brilliant, capable and honest leader of the reformist socialists, but this did not of itself mark him as a danger to the Fascists. His offence lay in his efficient exposure of the corruption in the Fascist movement. He recorded the deeds of Fascism day by day—not only its deeds of violence and tyranny, but its deeds of financial jobbery and commercial dishonesty. The enmity of the Fascists towards Matteotti was comprehensible enough, but they should have hesitated before they gave such rein to their passionate hatred. The murder of Matteotti, as Mussolini remarked, was not only a crime but a blunder. It played into the hands of the opposition by giving them an invaluable ground of attack on Fascism. Fascism, they argued, is defended as a means