Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Fascism, its history and significance
Image 23
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
W., L.. Fascism, its history and significance - Image 23. 1924. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 26, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4149/show/4127.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

W., L.. (1924). Fascism, its history and significance - Image 23. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4149/show/4127

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

W., L., Fascism, its history and significance - Image 23, 1924, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 26, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4149/show/4127.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Fascism, its history and significance
Creator (Local)
  • W., L.
Publisher The Plebs
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London, England
Date 1924
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Fascism
Subject.Name (Local)
  • W., L.
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 38 pages; 24 cm
Original Item Location JC481.F3 1924
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304502~S5
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 23
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_25194896_022.jpg
Transcript FASCISM 21 been bitter. In November, 1922, when the Fascist government was in power, an attack on the eight-hour day of the State railway was made. The Fascist Railway Union in Naples retaliated by seizing the station and driving out the Government officials, who were endeavouring to enforce the new hours system. This revolt, like so many others, was suppressed, but it is symptomatic of the workers' attitude to the Fascist regime even inside the National Corporations. The Fascists have given figures of membership which indicate a very high percentage of workers organised in the Corporations. There is no doubt that a large number of workers joined the Corporations out of fear : they saw what happened to active members of the genuine Unions, and they hoped to escape the wrath of their masters by enrolling in the Yellow Unions. Their great value to ■ Fascism lay in the fact that they brought the masses under the ideological influence of Fascism and gave the Fascists unparalleled opportunities for propaganda. It was through the Corporations that Fascism, which had been an isolated terrorist movement and had developed into an organised political party, now finally became a genuine mass organisation in the sense that it controlled the minds and actions of the majority of the workers. When that point had been reached, the seizure of the power of the State became possible. But this was in fact only achieved through further acts of treachery on the part of the right wing leaders of the working class. These had, by their advocacy of the evacuation of the factories, first opened the road to the Fascists. Then, as the terror developed, appalled by the consequences of their weakness, they could conceive no better remedy than an abject surrender—which they called " comphte passivity till the storm blew over ! " From the extreme of futile pacifism, the leaders rushed to another and (in the circumstances) disastrous policy. Turati, in July, 1922, made efforts to secure inclusion in Facta's newly formed cabinet, but the bourgeois terms were impossibly high. This left Turati and his friends in a difficult position, and they made a bold bid to recover their prestige by a move to the left. They declared a general strike. But the movement was badly organised. Whether the reformists were determined to bring about a failure so that they might use it as an argument against direct action, or whether they blundered through incompetence, is not clear. What is beyond dispute is that the declaration of a strike and its immediate and total collapse played into the hands of the Fascists. " The Bolshevik danger " was the slogan. The Fascists could point to the frivolity and the ineffectiveness of the socialist leaders as an awful warning of what might happen if the socialists obtained power. And as the labour movement broke up under the badness of its leadership,