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Fascism, its history and significance
Image 12
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W., L.. Fascism, its history and significance - Image 12. 1924. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 25, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4149/show/4116.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

W., L.. (1924). Fascism, its history and significance - Image 12. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4149/show/4116

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

W., L., Fascism, its history and significance - Image 12, 1924, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 25, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4149/show/4116.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Fascism, its history and significance
Creator (Local)
  • W., L.
Publisher The Plebs
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London, England
Date 1924
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Fascism
Subject.Name (Local)
  • W., L.
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 38 pages; 24 cm
Original Item Location JC481.F3 1924
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304502~S5
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 12
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_25194896_011.jpg
Transcript io FASCISM Secretary, D'Aragona, is a member of the Executive Committee of the P.S.I. This unity is not, unfortunately, sufficiently developed to ensure immediate common action on matters of urgent importance to the workers. At the time of the occupation of the factories in 1920, much valuable time and energy were wasted in discussing whether the movement was political or industrial in character, and which of the two organisations should accordingly control it. The policy of the P.S.I, tended continuously leftward throughout the ten years before the Great War. In 1911 the Tripoli war gave the Party an unexpected advantage. This war was remarkable even in the records of European imperialism for the brutality of its motives and methods. In the early stages, the Socialists offered only a slight resistance to the war, but the opposition grew in intensity and influence, its wide popularity becoming manifest. The membership and prestige of the Party rose rapidly and the pro-war sections were expelled. The experience of 1911 was of the utmost value to the Italian Socialists in 1914. When the campaign was started to secure the intervention of Italy on the side of the Entente, the P.S.I, adopted a clear anti-war attitude. The usual abuse was showered on the Socialists, who were criticised as friends of German autocracy when they were really the friends of the European workers. After the interventionists had triumphed and the workers of yet another nation had been led to the slaughter, the Italian Socialists were amongst the most active to secure peace negotiations. They made every effort to revive the International, and it was their influence that brought about the Conference of Socialists at Zimmerwald in September, 1915. Anti-war propaganda was certainly more readily received in Italy than in any other belligerent country, and the position of the Party in 1918, as a result of its anti-war policy, was more favourable than ever. The membership stood at 70,000, while the Party's influence was very wide. The years 1919 and 1920 furnished great opportunities to a revolutionary party, and the P.S.I, had many things in its favour. There had grown up in the Party a clear body of opinion in favour of a final break with reformism and the pursuit of a revolutionary policy. The programme had to be brought up to date. At the Bologna Congress in October, 1919, this step was taken. The Party had already in March of that year affiliated to the Third International by Executive resolution, and at Bologna a Communist resolution supported by Serrati and his friends was carried. The Party declared a belief in the need for illegal and violent methods of revolution, the establishment of Soviets, and the dictatorship of