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Fascism, its history and significance
Image 10
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W., L.. Fascism, its history and significance - Image 10. 1924. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 25, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4149/show/4114.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

W., L.. (1924). Fascism, its history and significance - Image 10. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4149/show/4114

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

W., L., Fascism, its history and significance - Image 10, 1924, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 25, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4149/show/4114.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Fascism, its history and significance
Creator (Local)
  • W., L.
Publisher The Plebs
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London, England
Date 1924
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Fascism
Subject.Name (Local)
  • W., L.
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 38 pages; 24 cm
Original Item Location JC481.F3 1924
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304502~S5
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 10
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_25194896_009.jpg
Transcript 8 FASCISM ditions^of Italian economic life after the war, and the failure of the working class to dominate the situation in 1919. The first thing to be understood about Italian economy is that it is primarily agricultural. Only in the north is industrial capitalism well-established, and even there the greater part of the population follows agricultural pursuits. In spite of their numerical inferiority, the industrialists are now the ruling class in Italy. Until the war, the landlord class predominated, the whole system of government working in their interests and hindering the expansion of the industrial north. The prime economic problem of the Italian industrialists is to secure a good supply of raw materials, especially of coal and iron, in which the country is very poor. The war gave the industrialists the opportunity they needed. An active policy of intervention in the war, with its promise of imperialist extensions, new markets, and new sources of fuel supply, was precisely what the industrialists desired. The agrarians, on the other hand, had no concern in imperialist expansion or coal supplies. They opposed the war, and in this they were joined by the proletariat, both urban and rural. It was at this stage that Mussolini appeared in the forefront of Italian politics. A campaign to popularise the idea of intervention among the workers and the small bourgeoisie was started. Mussolini had been a right wing Socialist and was the editor of the Party paper Avanti; as a result of his militarist attitude, a resolution expelling him was passed on 25th November, 1914, at Milan. Immediately afterwards, with funds provided largely by the French Government, he founded the paper called Popolo d'ltalia to support the case for Italy's participation in the war. It is significant that Mussolini's first arguments for war were drawn from Socialist ideology. War was to be the midwife of revolution ; it was to achieve the ideals at which Socialists aimed. " War or a Republic ! " was his cry, the implication being that the Republic was coming in any case—either before war or as a result of it : either way, the industrialists stood to gain, since either eventuality would give them the control of the State apparatus. Popolo d'Italia bore on its title page the phrase " a Socialist daily paper " until 1917, when Mussolini's Socialist principles were finally swamped by nationalist and bourgeois ideas. Giolitti, the Prime Minister, at that time represented (owing to his connection with the Banca Commerciale) pro-German and agrarian interests, and he was able to withstand the pressure of the interventionist campaign for a long time. But in the spring of 1915 he was forced to yield and his Government resigned. The King (although closely allied with the landed interests) dared not oppose the war movement, and the new Government declared war on Austria,