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Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia
Image 16
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Estes, Weston B.. Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia - Image 16. 1922. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 3, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4104/show/4099.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Estes, Weston B.. (1922). Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia - Image 16. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4104/show/4099

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Estes, Weston B., Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia - Image 16, 1922, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 3, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4104/show/4099.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Estes, Weston B.
Publisher Beckwith
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1922
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Prisons
  • Hospitals
  • Communism
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 15 pages; 25 cm
Original Item Location HV9712.E848 1922
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304403~S5
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Public Domain: This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 16
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_42632163_015.jpg
Transcript LIFE IN SOVIET RUSSIA The picture stands before you. Destruction as called for in the doctrines of Karl Marx as a prelude to reconstruction, that reconstruction to take place under certain conditions and certain influences, each fact predestined by the course of events promoted and encouraged by Entente Governments. This time and age is not a healthful one for kings. Political domination by single men or groups of men without the aid of capitalism is a bygone phase of our civilization, but having survived the troublesome period of political domination through autocracy, we have yet to regulate the industrial domination of capitalism. And this is the secret behind the curtain of Central European International Politics, and it is by this that we should judge current events. If, therefore, we find that the condition of Russia is such as to make us believe it will eventually be dominated as a German province, we have hut one conclusion left, and it is that the great interlocking banking group of Germany, that group which stabilized the political changes of Germany from autocracy to a nominal Republicanism, is the group to which we must look for responsibility for the chaos and destruction which they have achieved through Bolshevism as a camouflage. And these men by no means are working alone. They have their representatives working in, and their coordinating individuals influencing, every civilized government on the face of the earth. The dangerous element in the so-called radical movement is not the alien propagandist, the cart-tail orator. His work is only too open. The dangerous element is the directing force which has its center in Berlin and which is composed of those men who, through financial success, have achieved industrial and financial domination of the Central Empires. The dominant note at the present time in our lack of relations with Soviet Russia is the question as to whether we shall establish with it trade relations, and I desire to most emphatically register my protest against any such procedure. England has opened the way, and to what extent has it profited her? Nothing. She is in the position of one who has consented to enter into relations with criminals for the sake of personal selfish benefit, and also because of pressure exerted on her by the representatives in England of the same group to which I have alluded. We must under no circumstances encourage any such adventure for possible commercial reasons. On the other hand, every effort is being made to entice this government into the most restricted talking relationship which shall act in its turn as an entering wedge to larger negotiations. Here, apparently is the line of thought: "We cannot get the United States to recognize us as a dc facto government. Nor can we tempt them to recognize even a trade agreement, therefore we will get them, if possible, to alleviate our hunger." Thereby starting a train of events which in their logical conclusion must lead to relationships of some kind. It is therefore with some misgiving that'I have heard the stories of famine which have come from Russia in the past few months. There is famine in Central Russia—dire famine, but that exists largely because of lack of transportation facilities. In the relief of it from outside sources the problems to be solved are as great or greater than as if the resources which they have, were put to suitable use. But I would not now discourage anything which this great American republic can do to alleviate the sufferings in Central Russia. I believe