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Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia
Image 15
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Estes, Weston B.. Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia - Image 15. 1922. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4104/show/4098.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Estes, Weston B.. (1922). Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia - Image 15. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4104/show/4098

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Estes, Weston B., Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia - Image 15, 1922, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4104/show/4098.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Estes, Weston B.
Publisher Beckwith
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1922
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Prisons
  • Hospitals
  • Communism
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 15 pages; 25 cm
Original Item Location HV9712.E848 1922
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304403~S5
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Public Domain: This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 15
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_42632163_014.jpg
Transcript DR. WESTON I!. F.STES 13 grade in life and who has listened to their stories,-—their sad stories of struggle and sorrow and hardship—should have formulated some conclusions. Indeed it is right and necessary that he should do so. These people as I met them in prison would talk very much more freely on the inside than they would have dared on the outside. Many of them, at the time I heard them talk, were on the brink of their graves, which made truth more precious to them than would have been possible in any other time of life, and the first great conclusion based on these months of hardship and suffering is one that will startle you. It is this: that Communism is the most successful system that has ever been launched as a political program. And I know there is not a man in this room in view of what I have said, who is not shocked into wonder and amazement at this positive statement that I know to be so true. Communism is the most successful system that has ever been launched as a political program, and you are wondering how I can harmonize that with the story which I have already given you. It is perfectly simple if you know the true significance of events in Russia. Communism in Russia was never designed to work by its disciples and those who were actually its inaugurators. It was never intended to be a system of government that could possibly be successful, because inherent qualities which are necessary for the proper government of peoples are not present in any system of communism. The purpose for which it was instigated by those who had a hand in its inception was to use it as a method of destruction and to lead Russia to chaos. And they knew that this desired end would surely accompany an attempt to establish it as a working theory of government. They knew what its end would be as well as you or I, and therefore I am perfectly justified in saying that communism has worked successfully,—exactly as its originators intended, to destroy. There can be no question but that the aim of the whole program as it has unfolded itself to us in the past five years, the whole plan of action as we have seen it, has been laid for the purpose of a capitalistic domination of Russia, and has also for its ultimate aim the making of Russia a provincial state under the actual if not nominal control of Germany. Do not talk to me of humanitarianism in murder, altruism in thievery, or liberalism in oligarchy! These are as distant from each other as the east from the west. Socialism is not liberalism or progress. It is the rankest kind of reactionism, and do not forget that in the system which has been used so beautifully and so precisely for the destruction of Russia and for its subjugation at the hands of the German Jewish bankers, there is not one political principle, there is not one sociological fact which was not employed by those who were in control of the French Revolution, and who had exactly the same object in mind—domination. I believe this program has achieved its fruition. One can scarcely open a current newspaper or magazine without seeing evidence of German industrial control gaining ascendancy in Soviet Russia. You have before you worked out a program which has produced in Russia a vacuity of brains and ability, left behind unlimited resources, unlimited unskilled labor, and a political condition which can yield nothing but eventual control from external influences. "Nature abhors a vacuum," it is said. The technical numbers necessary for the development of Russia's resources will flow naturally from that point where there is a surplus.