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Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia
Image 14
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Estes, Weston B.. Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia - Image 14. 1922. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 28, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4104/show/4097.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Estes, Weston B.. (1922). Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia - Image 14. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4104/show/4097

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Estes, Weston B., Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia - Image 14, 1922, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 28, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4104/show/4097.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Estes, Weston B.
Publisher Beckwith
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1922
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Prisons
  • Hospitals
  • Communism
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 15 pages; 25 cm
Original Item Location HV9712.E848 1922
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304403~S5
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Public Domain: This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 14
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_42632163_013.jpg
Transcript 12 LIFE IN SOVIET RUSSIA Forests to Shoot Game for Flesh and Pelts," a ridiculous position for one of his attainments. I first saw Sergius in prison. The door of the cell where fifteen of us were crowded together opened and in he walked. He was six feet one in height, thin from long sickness and solitary confinement and with uncut beard. 1 shall never forget him. We soon found out who he was and what he was, and we learned that he had been arrested three and a half months prior to that, snatched from his family—just on his feet after five months illness with acute pleuropneumonia. Since that time, and before we saw him, he had been in solitary confinement. He was my cell-mate for three months, supplied to some extent with food by his family, but in the main undernourished, like the rest of us. None of us enjoyed either air or exercise. Shortly after Sergius was put in our cell (and five months after his arrest) he first learned of the reasons therefor. The months had passed and Sergius could not discover for what reason he had been arrested. Protests were of no avail. Finally he was taken before the "Checka" for inquisition and he learned he had been arrested because, it was said, his son, twenty-one years old, had been engaged in counter-revolutionary activities. Sergius protested.. He had no son twenty-one years of age. He was a well-known man, and with little difficulty his previous history could have been determined. Many people were in prison with us who had known him for years. He had married late in life, being at that time about fifty, and had only two children, the eldest of whom was barely fourteen. And yet apparently the "Checka" gave no thought as to the fact that his previous history could be learned from those right in our cell. Sergius stayed with us for three and a half months, and then one cold, snowy February day he was ordered to leave the cell, and we afterwards learned that he had been tramped through the snow and slush of Moscow four and a half miles to Butierki prison. Later, he was transferred back to our prison and kept in a cell in the basement for nearly two weeks, a cell which was partly underground and reeking with damp and filth. The chapter closes with the death of Sergius in the balnitsa where he had been taken from the basement cell in an unconscious state. I could multiply such instances by the score. Would it take one long to decide in the light of such facts tha!t the main purpose for which this system was inaugurated was to blot out the brains and ability of .the great Russian people? The story of my release is a short one. Mr. Hoover with his Food Fund was the ostensible means, and in this manner exhibiting a tact and courtesy quite unusual to a band of international criminals, the latter were allowed to save their faces. There is, however, another story behind that, the center of which lay in the trip of two warships up through Baltic waters, and which was stimulated through the efforts of the State Department. Coincident with the Baltic excursion an unofficial demand for our release was made, and soon we were without the confines of Soviet Russia. The picture of conditions generally in the large cities of Soviet Russia is reflected in the conduct of the Butierki prison hospital. I can assure you that the word "mess" is about the only way in which it can be described. • It is inevitable that one who has spent months in a Russian prison and who has come in contact with people of every walk and