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Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia
Image 13
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Estes, Weston B.. Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia - Image 13. 1922. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 28, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4104/show/4096.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Estes, Weston B.. (1922). Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia - Image 13. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4104/show/4096

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Estes, Weston B., Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia - Image 13, 1922, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 28, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4104/show/4096.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Estes, Weston B.
Publisher Beckwith
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1922
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Prisons
  • Hospitals
  • Communism
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 15 pages; 25 cm
Original Item Location HV9712.E848 1922
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304403~S5
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Public Domain: This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 13
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_42632163_012.jpg
Transcript DR. WESTON B. ESTES 11 mal life, such as we conceive of being attributes of wild beasts in the forests. No man died but what the food underneath his pillow was immediately stolen by those who survived him. I have seen fights in the wards among those who would profit by the loss of one of their own comrades. I saw a father and son fight over a scrap of food just prior to the former's death. And this is the condition of things which has brought Russia to a point where world communism would bring all of us, calling it a humanitarian movement. Can you conceive of the terrible mess in which Russia now lives? This hospital has the reputation in Moscow of being the best run and most efficiently conducted prison hospital in all Russia. I do not blame tbose physicians who were attending the patients in Butierki. There were seven of them for five hundred and fifty patients, one of whom was supposed each day to serve the full twenty- four hours. Half of them were women. The only Communist in the crowd was a Russian Jewess who acted as Chief of Staff. This: woman was about thirty-five years of age, with bobbed hair and rather attractive features; much more presentable than her superior, Feinberg. As Chief of Staff she had authority over all the prison inmates of the hospital and of the physicians who cared for them. As to her professional skill, it was most ordinary. She occasionally came into the ward, looked around and walked out. Some of the attending physicians were very lax in their attentions. In many instances the inmates saw the attending physician only twice a week, and even then many of the patients were missed. In this country full of paper regulations, hospital records were naturally of dubious quality. As a rule the ward nurse kept these records, such as they were, but oftentimes she was susceptible to friendly advances. Occasionally a so-called Control Committee visited us for the ostensible purpose of seeing to it that the hospital was properly administered and the patients received attention. The real intention behind this was to weed out those who were well enough to go back to prison. Those visits were always anticipated by friendly advances to the nurse, and in some instances by the more or less substantial addition of "Sovietsky roubles." The coincidence of a rise in temperature as charted prior to the visit of the Control Committee was oftentimes startling, and that is one way in which many of the speculators and others with a pull retained their beds and their greater freedom in the hospital. The natural consequence was that many sick men were forced to remain in prison uncared for, and many were forced to leave the hospital simply because they had no temperature and no pull. The story of my prison-found friend Sergius X. will illustrate many of the glaring incapacities, or the absolute indifference of government by graft. Sergius was an extremely well-known man in Moscow, of fine character, a splendid scholar, member of the Russian Academy, an author of scientific treatises and books, who also was a business man and had done much to develop the city of Moscow in its civic and industrial relations. Sergius fared as well as any man with brains could fare in such a jumble as this. He had lost his all,—confiscated by his government with no return or reward for his valuable collections and library, and he lived with his wife and two children in two rooms, using a kitchen in common with many other families in the same house. He was finally placed in charge of the "Commissariat Controlling the Hunters Who Went into the