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Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia
Image 12
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Estes, Weston B.. Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia - Image 12. 1922. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 28, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4104/show/4095.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Estes, Weston B.. (1922). Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia - Image 12. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4104/show/4095

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Estes, Weston B., Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia - Image 12, 1922, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 28, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4104/show/4095.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Estes, Weston B.
Publisher Beckwith
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1922
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Prisons
  • Hospitals
  • Communism
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 15 pages; 25 cm
Original Item Location HV9712.E848 1922
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304403~S5
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Public Domain: This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 12
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_42632163_011.jpg
Transcript 10 LIFE IN SOVIET RUSSIA later the ambulance, or some other conveyance, calls to take your dearest one to a place, damp, cold and foodless. In June of this year the hospitals of Moscow were refusing patients unless they could bring their own food. On the other hand, there is a brighter side to the picture. The speculator, the communist and the bandit with money can get what he wants by more direct methods. Apparently the communist system broke down, because now physicians are allowed to work in private practice after giving a portion of their time to the Soviet under the communist system. Thus you can see there are more rules and regulations in Russia, on paper, than in any other country in the world, and very few of them are actually lived up to. The consequence is that if you are wise—and have money—government regulations mean little. No one with roubles follows the government routine. If you want to procure a suit of clothes in Moscow, first you apply. A full suit of clothes for a man costs about one and a half million roubles, and a woman's suit about two million roubles. This sounds pretty big, but the day I left Moscow five million roubles equaled about a hundred dollars. I was a billionaire in Russia, and I left Russia in a pair of old cavalry trousers and no socks. Those, of course, are prices charged by the speculators and are, therefore, illegal. Practically there are no clothes in Russia to be obtained legally, except by the commissars and a few of their friends. The surgeon in charge of the barracks, where I was an inmate, was a very hard-working, able man. The operations were confined largely to patients suffering from hernia, appendicitis, and gun-shot wounds in bandits. Scarcely ever was a clean operation carried out without infection, except in isolated cases where the liberal use of bribe money obtained better work from the attendants. In connection with the operating room there was only one out of five sterilizers in order when I was there. Consequently the field of work was distinctly limtied, especially in view of the fact that the chief surgeon had no assistant. There were a few nurses who had lost their enthusiasm and morale. One of the chief assistants was an ex-cavalry officer from Wrangle's Army, himself a prisoner. At times there was no water in the operating room, and such as could be obtained was poured out of a pitcher to "scrub up." Many times there was no soap. I never saw but one or two towels in the operating room. The field of operation was never covered with sterile cloths, and yet all of the infections apparently occurred after the patients reached the wards, where it was simply impossible to carry out any degree of sterility in dressing wounds. Many men died in the ward. They never received any helpful attention. Never once did I see a laboratory diagnosis attempted. In fact, there was no laboratory. If there was str-ychnine in the hospital I never saw it, and I do not believe there was any. On rare occasions camphor was used as a stimulant, but the supply was small. On one occasion I did see an infusion of normal salt solution. But the deaths in the ward were harrowing because of the lack of opiates and anodynes, so relief from pain was almost impossible. Men died like sheep, with no more self-consciousness than an animal would have. In fact, animals in America are better treated than men in Soviet Russian hospitals and in prisons. Those who survived likewise manifested those attributes of ani-