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Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia
Image 11
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Estes, Weston B.. Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia - Image 11. 1922. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 28, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4104/show/4094.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Estes, Weston B.. (1922). Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia - Image 11. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4104/show/4094

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Estes, Weston B., Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia - Image 11, 1922, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 28, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4104/show/4094.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Estes, Weston B.
Publisher Beckwith
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1922
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Prisons
  • Hospitals
  • Communism
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 15 pages; 25 cm
Original Item Location HV9712.E848 1922
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304403~S5
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Public Domain: This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 11
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_42632163_010.jpg
Transcript DR. WESTON B. ESTES to the surgical ward where I could use my technical knowledge. The dental instruments consisted of a basket of forceps, none of which were of much value. They had been roughly treated by being used as nail-pullers, can-openers, etc. Consequently they were filthy, with rusty joints and in a generally dilapidated condition. A few pairs were available for use. With these I gradually worked up a thriving business, but oftentimes I was so weak I could not even hold the forceps, so finally was obliged to give up work. In the meantime, however, a murderer had been sent into the hospital, and was to be executed. He was one of a gang of twenty- four men who had raided a food warehouse, and in the melee which followed he had chopped off the head of a watchman with an axe. He and another man were caught, the rest escaping. He had been held in the hope of getting information concerning those who had escaped. Through an interpreter this man asked me to remove a remarkably fine piece of solid gold bridge work from his mouth, trying to make me believe that his teeth were bothering him. Finally the truth came out. It appeared that he was expecting to be shot any night, and he said he realized that if he went to his execution with such a fortune in his mouth it would be knocked out after his death by the guards—following their usual example of taking all valuables from the dead. He was anxious to have his wife receive the benefit of his previous dentistry. Naturally the commission was declined. This was not the only instance where requests of this sort were made to the dental surgeon of the prison hospital. As dentist to the hospital I was supposed to receive an extra half pound of bread, but it never reached me. In the meantime I had an attack of neuritis which evidently came from an infected upper tooth. I pulled that molar myself, but the story is too harrowing for even a Medical Society. An interesting phase of life in Soviet Russia, where attempts have been made to enforce communism and where collectivism has reached its climax, you will be interested in, because it is the logical culmination of a program initiated by Workmen's Compensation Acts Compulsory Health Insurance, and other forms of social insurance, such as is now in practice in American and England. Prior to my departure from Russia in August, if you desired medical attendance the procedure through which, legally, you must go in order to obtain this much desired help was as follows: First you took a trip to the nearest registration bureau, which is usually located in an apothecary shop. There is always a long queue waiting and you stand for hours in the street, no matter what the weather, for an opportunity to present your claims. It finally comes, and you depart in the hope that sometime you will get relief. The physician who is assigned to your district usually appears in about three days, but not always. He is a much overworked man, largely because of the increased illness resulting from semi-starvation. The doctor calls. His visit is apt to be cursory and he finally departs leaving you with a prescription. Then the same routine must be followed again in order to obtain your medicine; the long line is still in front of the apothecary shop, and when finally you reach the counter it is more than probable that the drugs which have been prescribed are not to be had and one must be contented with substitutes. If the patient must go to the hospital the same experience is yours. You register after a long wait, and maybe days or weeks