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Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia
Image 10
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Estes, Weston B.. Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia - Image 10. 1922. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 3, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4104/show/4093.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Estes, Weston B.. (1922). Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia - Image 10. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4104/show/4093

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Estes, Weston B., Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia - Image 10, 1922, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 3, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4104/show/4093.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Estes, Weston B.
Publisher Beckwith
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1922
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Prisons
  • Hospitals
  • Communism
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 15 pages; 25 cm
Original Item Location HV9712.E848 1922
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304403~S5
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Public Domain: This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 10
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_42632163_009.jpg
Transcript s LIFE IN SOVIET RUSSIA Russian Jews who had been arrested for speculation. They secured their transfer to the prison hospital through bribery and secured, through the same means, approximately competent surgical attention for their troubles. The whole arrangement was negotiated through bribery and graft and they obtained what none others could get, even to the extent of having sent to them from the city, Mellenkrodt's ether (made in St. Louis) for their own use and safety. They bribed the nurse for extra care. They paid for services of a special doctor,— the regular surgeon was away on his vacation and the money these men distributed paid for the services of another. Sterilization of instruments and dressings which no others could obtain were theirs. Special arrangements were made for the exclusive care and safety of these three Jewish speculators whose life in the present hospital was one long violation of the communistic theories. These three men were not exceptions of their type. There were many such. One of the chief reasons why I was anxious to be transferred to the prison hospital was that we had understood that the food in the hospital was better. We were getting one-third of a pound of jread daily in the prison, and it was rumored that the ration in the nospital was one and a half pounds. There was little more food available in the hospital, but considering its nutritive value, in reality, it was less. The bread ration at the hospital was one-half pound. There was a great deal of unrest and complaint on account of insufficiency of the food, and many patients were asking to go back to other prisons where, in spite of less freedom of movement, the food was better. Our bread ration for twenty-four hours—always less than two hundred grams—was given to us in the morning with hot water. There were two diets, regulation and so-called light, but there was little difference between the two so far as nutritive value was concerned. The regulation diet included a bowl of fish or cabbage soup, the former with the fat skimmed off before it reached the ward. Sometimes at noon we would receive small pieces of boiled meat. The quantity allowed for each, one may judge from the fact that the contents of an ordinary washbasin was divided among thirty-five men. For supper we had a small portion of millet or some grain, boiled, with no salt or seasoning. A little later a kettle of boiling water was sent into the ward with which we were supposed to make tea. The tea we furnished ourselves, if we could. In addition we had what was called a coffee ration, consisting of ground-up grains, acorns and other things, to the extent of one teaspoonful. Real coffee was never actually furnished. We were also allowed fifteen grams of sugar each day, but oftentimes it never came. Our fat allowance in the form of butter, which in theory was supposed to be furnished, was so small that it was said to be included in a portion of boiled rice or millet furnished at supper time. As a matter of fact it was never there, the authorities failing to furnish it, or possibly it had been stolen. Ten months after arrest, eight months of which were spent in the prison and two in the prison hospital, I received my first American Red Cross package, having lost forty pounds in weight. Speculators and bandits, and those who had relatives and friends in the city (with money), could receive food packages five times a week and, relatively speaking, they fared very well. I secured food oftentimes by selling my clothing,—socks, boots, shirts, etc., to guards. It became noised throughout the hospital that an American dentist was there, and through the intervention of friends, I was transferred