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Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia
Image 9
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Estes, Weston B.. Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia - Image 9. 1922. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 28, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4104/show/4092.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Estes, Weston B.. (1922). Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia - Image 9. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4104/show/4092

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Estes, Weston B., Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia - Image 9, 1922, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 28, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4104/show/4092.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Estes, Weston B.
Publisher Beckwith
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1922
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Prisons
  • Hospitals
  • Communism
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 15 pages; 25 cm
Original Item Location HV9712.E848 1922
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304403~S5
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Public Domain: This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 9
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_42632163_008.jpg
Transcript DR. WESTON B. ESTES were soiled and mussy. Dr. Feinberg is very near-sighted and wears thick glasses. Her fingernails were uncut and black with dirt. Tliis was the woman who had absolute authority over the health of one hundred thousand prisoners in Moscow and final say as to whether I was sick enough to go to a hospital. The fact that I had a hernia, dysentery, neuritis, insomnia and was scorbutic did not weigh in Dr. Feinberg's mind as causes for admission to her hospital. The determining factor was that I had a fever. Therefore, I think I am justified in my conclusions that her professional capacity was not large. It was a cold March day and the snow was on the ground when I was ordered to leave the cell with my pack. The guard took us to the curb station where I stood for nearly an hour, with another sick man, en route to the hospital. And this brings up an interesting incident. At this time one of the few things that had not been nationalized in Russia were the droshkis or public horse cabs. I am satisfied that even the Bolshevik could not have done this. The procedure which followed gave us something to laugh at. A cab was commandeered by the leader of the guard, during which process there was a long and wordy argument between the driver and the officer. Then we climbed in, drove three or four blocks and the driver refused to go any farther inasmuch as another cab was nearby. The driver never by any chance paid any attention to his starving horse, but devoted his attention entirely to our soldier. In four and a half miles to Butierki prison hospital we were transferred from cab to cab nine different times, each driver growing more vociferous in his protestations. Some of the arguments were terminated only when the guard drew his pistol. On arrival at the hospital the first thing that happened was that all our street clothes were taken away from us. We were supposed to have a receipt for them, but on leaving it is quite customary to be told that your boots or your hat, or something else, have been stolen. They shoved me into a ward where there were thirty-five patients suffering from all kinds of diseases: tuberculosis, skin lesions of various kinds,—and nearly everything else one could think of, all in one small room. We had little iron beds with boards for springs and they were covered with dirty straw mattresses. The dirt was something frightful and the vermin likewise. In the five weeks I was in the ward I never saw the slightest attempt made to clean the place. Patients expectorated on the floor. It was so damp that any food held over from day to day was almost invariably moulded. There was a small sheet-iron stove in the center of the ward. We had an armful of wood each day, and it was the custom to divide the small allotment into two parts, using one in the morning and one at night. I wondered for three days whether there were any doctors around, but finally one appeared and went through a very superficial examination. I do not know what particular good a diagnosis would have been in my case because there was very little that could have been done about it, even if he had had the most accurate technical knowledge. I learned in this five weeks that, for instance, the medicine available for use consisted largely of a little salol, bismuth occasionally, some castor oil and, for one who had the price to pay for it, an occasional dose of veronal to assist in sleeping. And in this prison hospital ward one could readily gain a conception of the enormity of the universal graft system which prevails in Soviet Russia. For instance, hard by our ward there appeared one day three