Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia
Image 8
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Estes, Weston B.. Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia - Image 8. 1922. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 28, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4104/show/4091.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Estes, Weston B.. (1922). Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia - Image 8. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4104/show/4091

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Estes, Weston B., Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia - Image 8, 1922, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 28, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4104/show/4091.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Estes, Weston B.
Publisher Beckwith
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1922
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Prisons
  • Hospitals
  • Communism
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 15 pages; 25 cm
Original Item Location HV9712.E848 1922
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304403~S5
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Public Domain: This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 8
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_42632163_007.jpg
Transcript LIFE IN SOVIET RUSSIA and with my knowledge of political conditions. It must be said that the Communist Party in Russia was divided into two factions, the Jewish and Gentile groups, with the former in the ascendancy. You may perhaps have noticed that the Communists have been cleaning house. It has been cleaned so that now only about half are left. Jews are in absolute control of the party without even a respectable minority. Obviously, John Reed did not belong to the Jewish majority. His race and his sincerity in his beliefs raised suspicions in the minds of his Jewish antagonists. It has been officially recorded that he died of typhus fever. His own wife, herself a sympathizer with Bolshevism, says that he died of neglect. I doubt if the truth will ever be fully known. When John Reed left my room at the hotel, Moghilevski reappeared. He spoke no English, and going out again, there immediately came in five agents of the "Checka." One of the men had been a sailor and undoubtedly, Bolshevik-like, he was put in charge of the party because of the paucity of his English. They searched and re-searched us thoroughly for three hours—went through our clothes everywhere. Then, under arrest, we were taken in an automobile to a prison at No. 2 Lubianka. Then occurred another ex- imination lasting four* or five hours. The heels of our shoes were knocked off; linings of our satchels split; coats and clothes ripped to pieces—in fact, we were thoroughly searched. All personal documents were seized. At two o'clock in the morning, allowing us each a towel, Mr. Flick and I were ushered into the courtyard, and after another thorough examination by the keeper of the prison, we were laced in separate cells. It was a simple, small room in which I was placed, and I remember that I was amused at the absurdity of finding myself locked up in a room. It was about 7l/> by 11 feet—three boards nailed together resting on saw horses for a bed—and a table. The window was rather large, barred, and with frosted panes to prevent seeing out. It was of the customary continental type with double sashes, and was nailed up. And in this room, on the second floor, I was kept in solitary confinement for three months, during which time I was subjected to twenty-three inquisitions before the counter-revolutionary tribunal or "Checka." Our food was very insufficient during the eight months that I was in this prison. The quarters were so ill-heated and dirty, and lack of exercise and the crowded condition generally so undermining that finally these things told on my health and one by one symptoms began to appear which under ordinary circumstances, would have entitled me to hospital treatment and the care of a doctor. That was not my lot, however, for several months. The inroads on my health began to be greater and greater. Finally, at the protest of a fellow prisoner, who was a Russian doctor, an interesting character appeared to "write me" into a hospital. She was a certain Dr. Feinberg, a Russian Jewess who again represented a type which is in control of Soviet forces. Dr. Feinberg headed a Commission, and as such had authority in all matters pertaining to the health of prisoners in Moscow. Her decision was final and absolute in such matters. When she appeared in my cell she presented a rather welcome diversion. Her hair was sloppy and bobbed. It was tied with a dirty red ribbon— and she had a suspicious habit of scratching her head. Her clothes