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Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia
Image 7
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Estes, Weston B.. Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia - Image 7. 1922. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4104/show/4090.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Estes, Weston B.. (1922). Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia - Image 7. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4104/show/4090

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Estes, Weston B., Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia - Image 7, 1922, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4104/show/4090.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Estes, Weston B.
Publisher Beckwith
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1922
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Prisons
  • Hospitals
  • Communism
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 15 pages; 25 cm
Original Item Location HV9712.E848 1922
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304403~S5
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Public Domain: This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 7
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_42632163_006.jpg
Transcript DR. WESTON B. ESTES ous street; the only places that we saw open were soldiers' and sailors' tea rooms, a Soviet aptek (drug store) or two and a few government food shops before which long queues of people were waiting for service. We also saw one flower store, and the Singer Sewing Machine Building, which Was open. Apparently most of the street car lines centering in that district were in operation. Under government control no one paid fare and the consequence was that every car was jammed. People stood in long . queues at stopping points to hoard, and seemingly waited hours for the opportunity to ride to their destination. Under the Czar's Government the Petrograd-Moscow Express covered the distance between those cities in seven hours. Our train consumed fourteen hours, arriving in Moscow at noon. We were met at the station by an automobile, and by a man who afterwards was destined to play a large part in our Moscow experience, Moghilevski. who was commissar for the Foreign Section of the Extraordinary Commission, which is the highest authority in the Soviet Government. His position is one which means as much as the descriptive name implies. The "Checka" really runs the Russian Government through terrorism. It is a court of first and last resort from which there is no appeal. Not even Lenine or Trotzki negative its decisions, so that Moghilevski typifies the character of the government for which he works. Moghilevski is a Polish Jew of the exaggerated variety. He used to be a gambler and shady character. He was a man about thirty- five years of age. with a wicked face. A slight defect in one eye gave him the appearnce of having a tendency toward cross-eye. Moghilevski is decisive and of quick manner, wasting little time on preliminaries. Later, when appearing before the "Checka" and under arrest. Moghilevski told me that the "floor of this room is soaked with the tears of persons pleading for mercy, but this is no place for mercy. This is a place to exterminate counter-revolutionists." Moghilevski in his way is the most powerful man in Russia, and the fate of foreign prisoners rests entirely in his hands. Moghilevski took me to a sadly deteriorated apartment house which in older days was a fashionable residence. A little later John Reed called, apparently eager to know what information I had for him that would be helpful. We talked nearly an hour. In this conversation I began to get an inkling of true conditions, and Reed told me a few minutes before we parted that things were not going as well there as world communism would have us believe. In the meantime Moghilevski, ever watchful, dodged in and out of the room without taking the precaution of knocking. This made Reed nervous and we did not finish our conversation. He finally left, with the remark that he would meet me on the day following. I did see John Reed once more. On the following night, he acted as my interpreter before the Extraordinary Commission for the Suppression of Counter Revolution, the "Checka," and then he passed from my personal observation. With prison at hand and death staring me in the face, he whispered, as he left the room of inquisition, 'Do not worry, everything will come out all right. I will help you all I can." It would be a difficult matter to prove that John Reed was murdered, and yet if he had been, the event would have fitted in perfectly with my previous knowledge to the effect that his life was in danger,