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Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia
Image 6
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Estes, Weston B.. Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia - Image 6. 1922. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 28, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4104/show/4089.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Estes, Weston B.. (1922). Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia - Image 6. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4104/show/4089

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Estes, Weston B., Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia - Image 6, 1922, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 28, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4104/show/4089.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Estes, Weston B.
Publisher Beckwith
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1922
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Prisons
  • Hospitals
  • Communism
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 15 pages; 25 cm
Original Item Location HV9712.E848 1922
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304403~S5
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Public Domain: This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 6
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_42632163_005.jpg
Transcript LIFE IN SOVIET RUSSIA up to forty-five years of age were given two years in which to learn to read and write! We also wanted to know more about his wonderful system of children's colonies. I left New York in January, 1920, on the steamer "Stavanger- f jord" and first landed at Christiania where I met the Swedish radical Stang. I realized afterward that Stang was quite as ignorant of true conditions in Russia as radicals in other parts of the world. Stockholm was the next stopping point, where I met Strom and Hellberg, the official Soviet representatives in Sweden. They advised me to see Litvinov. the chief Soviet agent outside of Russia. I did see Litvinov at Copenhagen where we discussed the possibility of selling American- manufactured goods to Russia. Then we went to Finland where in Helsingfors I came into close contact with the Finnish Reds. Our application to enter Russia was made at Reval, Esthonia, to which point we went from Helsingfors. By that time the Polish war had just begun and practically all vises were being denied, except to a few well- known foreign communists who were enroute to attend the Second Congress of the Third International to be held at Moscow. We waited in Reval three and a half months and finally, by a little manipulation, succeeded in getting our papers stamped, and this is how we did it. When I was in Helsingfors, John Reed, the American communist, was under arrest by the Finnish Government, imprisoned at Albo, and stopped in an attempt to reach America. I had something to do in procuring his release, and after his return to Russia I secured authentic information to the effect that John Reed's life was in clanger. I wanted to get into Russia and I used these facts to get there. By those devious ways in which, under the circumstances, people communicate, I sent word to John Reed that 1 knew his life was in danger even in Russia and that he would never be allowed to leave it again, alive. The plan worked, for the following reasons: John Reed knew me and knew that I was safe. He had been betrayed by certain radical elements in Helsingfors and he himself knew that his life was in danger, therefore he was eager to seek information from me and further assistance in getting back home. Reed obtained my vise personally from Chicherin. the Commissar for Foreign Affairs. The gates were ojiened and on August 2nd, 1920. I crossed the frontier. The Russian train in which I reached Petrograd was typical of the transportation facilities as they existed at that time. The cars were dirty and unkempt: the train never proceeded at a greater speed than twenty miles an hour, with frequent stops on account of defective equipment. The air brakes refused to function once, and twice the running gear of cars broke down. Many car windows were broken. The train was so crowded that people rode on the steps. When we arrived at Petrograd, late in the evening, there were no lights in the ordinary coaches with the exception of a few candles. On the way across country we saw many men working in the fields, as it was harvesting time. Apparently there was nothing the matter, nor were there any unusual conditions. We counted the factory chimneys in an effort to judge of industrial conditions. I counted two hundred dead stacks and about a dozen from which smoke was issuing. We walked around the streets of Petrograd for two days. There was no evident disorder. There was a great deal of grass growing in the side streets while the main thoroughfares, such as the Nevsky Prospeckt, were fairly clean. The shops were all closed on that fam-