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Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia
Image 5
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Estes, Weston B.. Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia - Image 5. 1922. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 28, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4104/show/4088.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Estes, Weston B.. (1922). Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia - Image 5. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4104/show/4088

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Estes, Weston B., Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia - Image 5, 1922, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 28, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4104/show/4088.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Estes, Weston B.
Publisher Beckwith
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1922
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Prisons
  • Hospitals
  • Communism
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 15 pages; 25 cm
Original Item Location HV9712.E848 1922
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304403~S5
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Public Domain: This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 5
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_42632163_004.jpg
Transcript Prison and Hospital Life in Soviet Russia by Dr. Weston B. Estes An Address Delivered Before the Members of the Associated Physicians of Long Island, Garden City, October, 1921 Mr. President, Ladies and Gentlemen: Notwithstanding some difficulties in entering Soviet Russia, I came to the conclusion afterwards that the commissars were in reality glad to see me. They opened the gate and after T stepped over the border, they closed it very quickly. In Esthonia, they couldn't arrest me; in Moscow, they could. I have every reason to believe that they were anxious to make of me a personal acquaintance. As a matter of fact, to take moving pictures was something of a camouflage because I was really very anxious to do some business with the Communists and their Government. For two years, we had heard from many sides—and you hear it today—that the blockade of Russia was responsible for the chaos and devastation which is there. There is that element of doubt in the minds of many people as to the facts. Is there a real blockade, or is there a chance to do some business with these people? I had a strong desire to find out the truth, and find it out for myself. I gathered a little company of business men together, and they told me to get the truth. They said to me, if there is a blockade, we will break it. We will sell Russia or any other country those wants which we manufacture. At the same time, I was interested in moving pictures because there is a demand in this country for authentic information concerning those things which are going on in Soviet Russia. Facts are wanted by the American people more than anything else. I had been in contact with the radicals and communists in New York City and had reached the point of having an eager desire to know. It is a fact that very few of us know much about the Communist movement or its present-day dangers. You may say that these people are fanatics, but some are very sincere. They, as well as we, depend on foreign sources for information, and they are very strong and very dangerous. These people believe in Lenine and believe that he has done something worth while. Some of these radicals also asked me to go into Soviet Russia and they .helped me get there, and they said that they wanted pictures taken of the great schools which reputedly had been set up in Russia by Lunacharski, where all men and women