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Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia
Image 4
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Estes, Weston B.. Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia - Image 4. 1922. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 3, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4104/show/4087.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Estes, Weston B.. (1922). Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia - Image 4. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4104/show/4087

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Estes, Weston B., Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia - Image 4, 1922, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 3, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4104/show/4087.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Estes, Weston B.
Publisher Beckwith
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1922
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Prisons
  • Hospitals
  • Communism
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 15 pages; 25 cm
Original Item Location HV9712.E848 1922
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304403~S5
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Public Domain: This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 4
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_42632163_003.jpg
Transcript "There are plenty of people who, against all the evidence, still believe in communism, socialism, government ownership of railroads, Non-Partisan Leagues and the like, but then there are many people who still believe in fairies, ghosts and Russian rubles as an investment for trust funds. We shall continue to have countless books on socialism, just as we shall always have blue-sky stock; not because either is worth the paper it is printed on, but because, as Poor Richard says: "Samson with his strong body, had a weak head, or he would not have laid it in a harlot's lap." Editorial, Saturday Evening Post, Feb. 4, 1922. m "It would be hard to overestimate the damage that has been done to the world by writers like Karl Marx, who have put out dull romances in the guise of serious economic discourses; or by those politicians who issue unlimited promises at the expense of the tax-payers, provided they can be discounted in votes from the tax- free. The people, and in that term we include merchants and manufacturers as well as farmers, have plenty of troubles, plenty of grievances, but they will not be cured by any panacea in the politician's pharmacopoeia. As Poor Richard says: "Here comes the orator, with his flood of words and his drop of reason." Editorial, Saturday Evening Post, Feb. 4, 1922.