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Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia
Image 3
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Estes, Weston B.. Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia - Image 3. 1922. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4104/show/4086.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Estes, Weston B.. (1922). Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia - Image 3. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4104/show/4086

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Estes, Weston B., Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia - Image 3, 1922, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4104/show/4086.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Prison and hospital life in Soviet Russia
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Estes, Weston B.
Publisher Beckwith
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1922
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Prisons
  • Hospitals
  • Communism
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 15 pages; 25 cm
Original Item Location HV9712.E848 1922
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304403~S5
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Public Domain: This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 3
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_42632163_002.jpg
Transcript FOREWORD i As time passes, the issue becomes less obscure. The rapprochement of Germany and Russia, so long anticipated by those who discern, has become a certainty. The German Red Cross Mission of 1921 to Russia was a commercial venture; Max Warburg & Co., the Hamburg bankers, have been granted exclusive shipping rights by the Soviet Government; German products are fast filling the needs of the Russian people; the depreciated shares of "nationalized" Russian stock-companies have been bought up by German bankers in anticipation of "denationalization"; German technicians are filling places in the industrial life of Russia made vacant by slaughter of bourgeoisie under the pretense of enforcing a new social and political millenium. Facts clearly show the trend of events. Thus the Germanizing of Russia progresses each day, aided by a group of internationalists, friends of Germany, who shape as they can the policies of Entente countries. Doctor Estes learned many things while confined in a Moscow prison. He discovered what he so forcibly brings out: that communism was never intended to be successful but was designed for and used as a means of destruction. The Bolshevik revolution was in reality a German revolution, stimulated by the German Jewish Banking cabal. It was no more a reaction of a desperate people against oppression than is Sinn Feinism. It was intended to drag Russia out of the war, and then to make of Russia a German province. In both it has been eminently successful. Who will venture a prediction as to the ultimate end of this program? Germany is so "poverty-stricken" that she cannot pay just obligations to France! Russia under a Soviet has repudiated a similar debt. Yet the rulers of both, bound by racial ties, have absolute domination over boundless resources, yet undeveloped, and all but countless individuals. What means this union for the rest of the world and the Anglo-Saxon peoples? Peter Beckwith. New York, March, 1922.