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The fifth year of the Russian revolution
Image 17
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Cannon, James Patrick, 1890-1974. The fifth year of the Russian revolution - Image 17. 1923?. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4083/show/4075.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Cannon, James Patrick, 1890-1974. (1923?). The fifth year of the Russian revolution - Image 17. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4083/show/4075

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Cannon, James Patrick, 1890-1974, The fifth year of the Russian revolution - Image 17, 1923?, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4083/show/4075.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The fifth year of the Russian revolution
Alternative Title The fifth year of the Russian revolution: a report of a lecture
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Cannon, James Patrick, 1890-1974
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Workers Party of America
Publisher Workers Party of America
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1923?
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
  • Economics
  • History
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Russian Revolution, 1917-1921
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 21 pages; 19 cm
Original Item Location DK265.C365 1923
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304535~S5
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Public Domain: This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 17
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_13403385_016.jpg
Transcript r, off to battle and then chased up a back alley when he comes home. He is not given a medal when he is needed and refused a job or a handout when the war is over. In the working class society of Russia the red soldier has a place of dignity and honor. In Russia the soldiers and the workers are the real "people of importance." I saw another phase of the educational work of the army in one of the camps. It was a moving picture show attended by about two thousand soldiers. It was a moving picture of large scale grain farming in Canada. Most of the soldiers in the audience were peasant lads. They had come from the villages and their idea of agriculture was founded on the primitive, individualistic methods they had always known. Most of them had never seen a farming implement larger than a one-horse plow. Here on the screen before them was flashed a picture of modern farming on a big scale, with tractors, gang-plows and great threshing machines; a single working unit covering hundreds of acres at a time. They drank in that picture very eagerly. As I watched them I saw another picture. I saw those peasant lads going back home when their service in the army would be ended, with their newly acquired knowledge and their vision of the great world outside their little villages, telling their friends and their old folks of the great farming machinery which the city worker will manufacture for the peasants and which will be the means of developing large-scale communal farming instead of small-scale individual farming; and which will transform the individualist peasant of today into the communist peasant of tomorrow. I found the red soldiers pretty well informed as to what is going on in the world. They spoke of the prospects of revolution in Germany with the air of men who had read and talked much about it. That is part of their education, Trotsky keeps them fully informed about international developments; and there are special communist detachments in all regiments who carry on a constant propaganda for internationalism. Capitalist journalists write a great deal about the intense national patriotism of the red army. These stories are usually written by journalists who sit around in Moscow hotels and cook up tsories about it, and, as a rule, they are very far from the truth. As a matter of fact, the main effort of Communist — 17 —