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The fifth year of the Russian revolution
Image 14
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Cannon, James Patrick, 1890-1974. The fifth year of the Russian revolution - Image 14. 1923?. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 15, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4083/show/4072.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Cannon, James Patrick, 1890-1974. (1923?). The fifth year of the Russian revolution - Image 14. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4083/show/4072

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Cannon, James Patrick, 1890-1974, The fifth year of the Russian revolution - Image 14, 1923?, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 15, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4083/show/4072.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The fifth year of the Russian revolution
Alternative Title The fifth year of the Russian revolution: a report of a lecture
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Cannon, James Patrick, 1890-1974
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Workers Party of America
Publisher Workers Party of America
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1923?
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
  • Economics
  • History
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Russian Revolution, 1917-1921
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 21 pages; 19 cm
Original Item Location DK265.C365 1923
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304535~S5
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Public Domain: This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 14
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_13403385_013.jpg
Transcript old proverb says, "Tell me whose bread you eat and I'll tell you whose song you sing." The Soviet Government is a labor government and it makes no secret of the fact that it is partial to the working class. It doesn't pretend to be fair or neutral. They frankly call the government a dictatorship. "It's just like your own government in America," they told me, "only it is a dictatorship of a different class." "Otherwise the two governments are much alike," they said. "They are both dictatorships. But there is another difference. The Russian Government says it is a dictatorship and makes no camouflage about it. The government of the United States pretends to be fair and democratic, to represent both the workers and the capitalists, but whenever you have a big strike the government soon shows whom it belongs to." Ninety-eight of all the delegates to this Fifth All-Russian Trade Union Congress were members of the Communist Party. Those figures constitute another answer to the question: "How does the Communist Party keep in power?" When more than a thousand trade union delegates come together from all parts of Russia, and more than 98% of them are Communists, it is a pretty reliable indication, I think, that the Communist Party has its roots very deep in the basic organizations of the workers. Referring to the fact wages of the Russian workers had been increased 100% during the past year, keeping even pace with the increased production, Zinoviev laid before the Congress the program of the Communist Party on the question of wages and production. He said the two must go forward together, hand in hand. "Every country in the world," he said, "outside of Russia has built up its industrial system at the price of an impoverished and exploited working class. The capitalist countries have built a marvelous industrial system; they have erected great structures of steel and stone and cement; they have piled up wealth that staggers calculation. And alongside of all this they have a hungry and impoverished working class which made it all. For all their toil and accomplishments the workers have reaped a harvest of poverty and misery." "Russia," he said, "must not e,' i that way. We are a working class nation and we must not forget that the interest of the workers must b«j our first eon- — 14 —