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The fifth year of the Russian revolution
Image 10
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Cannon, James Patrick, 1890-1974. The fifth year of the Russian revolution - Image 10. 1923?. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 28, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4083/show/4068.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Cannon, James Patrick, 1890-1974. (1923?). The fifth year of the Russian revolution - Image 10. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4083/show/4068

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Cannon, James Patrick, 1890-1974, The fifth year of the Russian revolution - Image 10, 1923?, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 28, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4083/show/4068.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The fifth year of the Russian revolution
Alternative Title The fifth year of the Russian revolution: a report of a lecture
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Cannon, James Patrick, 1890-1974
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Workers Party of America
Publisher Workers Party of America
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1923?
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
  • Economics
  • History
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Russian Revolution, 1917-1921
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 21 pages; 19 cm
Original Item Location DK265.C365 1923
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304535~S5
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Public Domain: This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 10
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_13403385_009.jpg
Transcript of Russia—and the oil fields around Baku, were all held by hostile armies. When the Red Army re-captured these territories, the industries were in ruins. The Soviet Government bent itself to this task and in 1922 made substantial headway. Coal production was increased 25% over 1921, naphta 20%, cast iron 42%, while iron and steel production in 1922 doubled that of the year before. In 1913, before the imperialist war began, the Russian railroads loaded 30,000 cars a day. In 1918, at the low tide of the revolution, when the blockade was still in effect and hostile armies surrounded Russia with a ring of steel, the number of railroad cars loaded daily dropped to 7590. By 1921 this figure was brought up to 9500. In 1922 the improvement was continued and 11,500 cars were loaded; this is more than one-third of the pre-war volume. Russia's great problem to-day is the problem of heavy industry. The leaders of the Russian revolution recognize this and are concentrating all their energies on that task. The Soviet Government is saving on everything in order to help the heavy industry. All state appropriations, even those for schools, are being reduced for this purpose. When some sentimental people complained that the reduction of school appropriations was a backward step, Lenin answered that the chance for Russia to become a really civilized and cultured nation depended on the improvement of the heavy industry. That is the foundation. The Soviet Government last year made a profit of 20,000,000 gold rubles on its trading activities. That is the equivalent of ten million dollars, and the whole of it was given by the Government as a subsidy to heavy industry. Likewise a considerable portion of the tax collected from the peasants and from the nepmen engaged in commerce goes for that purpose. One way of attracting outside capital, which has attained some degree of success, is through the formation of so-called mixed companies. The Soviet Government goes into partnership with private capitalists in commercial enterprises, such as putting up part of the capital and sharing in the management and the profits. Lenin told us that by this means a large number of workers are enabled to learn from the capitalists — 10 —