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The fifth year of the Russian revolution
Image 9
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Cannon, James Patrick, 1890-1974. The fifth year of the Russian revolution - Image 9. 1923?. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4083/show/4067.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Cannon, James Patrick, 1890-1974. (1923?). The fifth year of the Russian revolution - Image 9. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4083/show/4067

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Cannon, James Patrick, 1890-1974, The fifth year of the Russian revolution - Image 9, 1923?, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4083/show/4067.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The fifth year of the Russian revolution
Alternative Title The fifth year of the Russian revolution: a report of a lecture
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Cannon, James Patrick, 1890-1974
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Workers Party of America
Publisher Workers Party of America
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1923?
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
  • Economics
  • History
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Russian Revolution, 1917-1921
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 21 pages; 19 cm
Original Item Location DK265.C365 1923
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304535~S5
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Public Domain: This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 9
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_13403385_008.jpg
Transcript this kind that bolstered up the hope of European and American capitalists, and their political agents, that the Soviet Government was certain to fall. These gentlemen reckoned without the Russian working class and the Communist Party that leads and inspires it. In the revolution and the war which followed it for more than four years, the Communist Party dared the "impossible"—and accomplished it. The same courage and determination characterize its attack on the problem of industry. Seval Zimmand told me a story of a meeting which he had an opportunity to attend in the Ural industrial district. It was a conference of engineers, factory managers and trade union leaders presided over by Bogdanoff, the commisar of the Supreme Council of Public Economy. After discussing all features of the situation with the engineers and managers, and hearing their reports, Bogdanoff said, "I know that it is hard to improve the industries in the Ural. But the industries of the Ural can be improved and the industries of the Ural must be improved." There, in one word, is a definition of the Communist Party of Russia—the party of MUST! While others say, "It is impossible," and, "We had better wait," or, "It can't be done," the Communist Party says, "It must be done!"—and the Communists go ahead and do it. Russian industry, on the whole, in 1922 registered a general increase of production of more than 100%. This brought the standard of production up to 25% of the pre-war condition. This condition is bad enough, but the Russian workers lived through a worse one, and they have begun to make headway. Russian exports in 1922 were six times greater than the year before. In 1921 the exports were only 5% of the imports. Last year they were brought up to 25%. All the light industries, that is those which produce for the market, improved remarkably last year and are now in pretty fair shape. The heavy industries, that is the coal, iron, steel and oil industries, whose product goes mainly to the other state industries—only about ten per cent of it being sold in the market—recover more slowly. Here the problem is a colossal one. For a long time after the revolution, all these basic industries were in the hands of counter-revolutionary armies. The iron region in the Urals, the coal, iron and steel in the Donetz Basin—the Pennsylvania — 9 —