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The fifth year of the Russian revolution
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Cannon, James Patrick, 1890-1974. The fifth year of the Russian revolution - Image 3. 1923?. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 26, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4083/show/4061.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Cannon, James Patrick, 1890-1974. (1923?). The fifth year of the Russian revolution - Image 3. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4083/show/4061

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Cannon, James Patrick, 1890-1974, The fifth year of the Russian revolution - Image 3, 1923?, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 26, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4083/show/4061.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The fifth year of the Russian revolution
Alternative Title The fifth year of the Russian revolution: a report of a lecture
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Cannon, James Patrick, 1890-1974
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Workers Party of America
Publisher Workers Party of America
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1923?
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
  • Economics
  • History
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Russian Revolution, 1917-1921
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 21 pages; 19 cm
Original Item Location DK265.C365 1923
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304535~S5
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Public Domain: This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 3
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_13403385_002.jpg
Transcript .■ THE FIFTH YEAR of the RUSSIAN REVOLUTION Russia Through the Shadows The story of Soviet Russia for the first four years after the revolution was a story of desperate struggle against tremendous odds. The fight of the Russian workers did not end with their victory over the bourgeoisie within Russia. The capitalist class of the entire world came to the aid of Russian capitalism. The Workers' Republic was blockaded and shut off from the world. Counter-revolutionary plots and uprisings inside of Russia were financed and directed from the outside. Mercenary invading armies backed by world capital, attacked Soviet Russia on all sides. On top of all this came the terrible famine which threatened to deal the final blow. In those four years Soviet Russia indeed went "through the shadows." But now, after five years of the revolution, we can tell a brighter story. In 1922 Soviet Russia began to emerge from the shadows and started on the upward track. The long and devastating civil war was at an end and the counter-revolution stamped out. The great famine was conquered. The last of the invading foreign armies—except the Japanese in the Far East—had been driven from Russian soil; and the Workers' Government, freed from the terrible strain and necessity of war, was enabled, for the first time, to turn its efforts and energies to the great constructive task of building a new Russia on the ruins of the old. While I was yet in Russia the Red Army drove the Japanese out of Vladivostok and set up the Soviets again. And before the Fourth Congress of the Communist International was ended, we had the joy of hearing comrade Lenin say that all the territory of Russia was at last living in peace under the Red Flag of the Soviets. I reached Moscow on the first day of June. Signs of recuperation from the long travail were already noticeable. The streets and sidewalks were being repaired and buildings were being — 3 —