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Georgia, a social-democratic peasant republic, impressions and observations
Image 102
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Kautsky, Karl, 1854-1938. Georgia, a social-democratic peasant republic, impressions and observations - Image 102. 1921. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 27, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3970/show/3955.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kautsky, Karl, 1854-1938. (1921). Georgia, a social-democratic peasant republic, impressions and observations - Image 102. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3970/show/3955

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kautsky, Karl, 1854-1938, Georgia, a social-democratic peasant republic, impressions and observations - Image 102, 1921, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 27, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3970/show/3955.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Georgia, a social-democratic peasant republic, impressions and observations
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Kautsky, Karl, 1854-1938
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Stenning, H. J. (Henry James), 1889-, translator
Publisher International Bookshops
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London, England
Date 1921
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Georgia
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 111, [1] pages; 19 cm
Original Item Location DK5ll.G3K3 1921
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304504~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Public Domain: This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 102
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2669984_101.jpg
Transcript In order to be able to deny the invasion of Russian troops, it was first stated that some villages on the Georgian frontier had revolted, embittered by the tyranny olf the Georgians. Somie Armenians on the southern border had given the signal, and then the rebellion spread to Signakh, which lies in the east of Georgia, towards Azerbaijan. Simultaneously, Abkhasia had risen in the extreme north-west, close to the Russian border. It is a remarkable fact that the rebellions broke out precisely in those places, Armenia, Azerbaijan and Abkhasia where large and constantly increasing masses of Russian troops had been quartered since November. The inhabitants of some Armenian border villages are supposed to have insisted on advancing towards Tiflis. The Russian Government stated it had endeavoured, out of love of peace and benevolence, to help the threatened Geosrgian regime, and offered its mediation between the Georgians and the Armenians. It could not help it if Georgia contemptuously rejected this mediation. But scarcely was Tiflis captured than the picture immediately changed. The Armenians had discharged their debt, the Armenians could go. No further mention was made in the Russian telegrams of Armenian, rebellions, but now it suddenly appears that Communists had captured Tiflis and overthrown the Menshevists. "Pravda" (in Moscow) congratulates the Georgian comrades, and says that "Menshevist Georgia has become the last refuge for the counter-revolution." No further references to the Armenian rebellions or to the peace mediations. Can any reasonable man hold it to be possible that Moscow would have offered its helpful mediation to a Menshevist Government which was threatened by Communists? The later Russian telegrams about events in Georgia brand thes first news as lies. They more closely approach the truth, but do not quite touch it. They admit that Tiflis was captured by Communists, and not by revolt- ioo