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Georgia, a social-democratic peasant republic, impressions and observations
Image 101
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Kautsky, Karl, 1854-1938. Georgia, a social-democratic peasant republic, impressions and observations - Image 101. 1921. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 27, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3970/show/3954.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kautsky, Karl, 1854-1938. (1921). Georgia, a social-democratic peasant republic, impressions and observations - Image 101. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3970/show/3954

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kautsky, Karl, 1854-1938, Georgia, a social-democratic peasant republic, impressions and observations - Image 101, 1921, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 27, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3970/show/3954.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Georgia, a social-democratic peasant republic, impressions and observations
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Kautsky, Karl, 1854-1938
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Stenning, H. J. (Henry James), 1889-, translator
Publisher International Bookshops
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London, England
Date 1921
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Georgia
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 111, [1] pages; 19 cm
Original Item Location DK5ll.G3K3 1921
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304504~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Public Domain: This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 101
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2669984_100.jpg
Transcript CHAPTER XII. THE BOLSHEVIST INVASION. In the first period of independent Georgia, its forces had been put to many hard tests. But its severest trial came last spring, as the result of the Bolshevist invasion by the strong Russian forces, simultaneously fromi the south, from the north, and from the east. This treacherous invasion occurred without any declaration of war in the first half of February. The world first heard of it from the Georgian side. The Social-Democratic Party and the Trade Unions, as well as the Federal Socialist Party, announced positively, together with the Georgian Government, that Georgia had been invaded by Russian troops, and was threatened to the utmost. They expected an immediate and vigorous protest against the proceedings of Moscow would be forthcoming from the International Socialist Congress at Viennia. Unfortunately the telegrami arrived late, and, in addition, the Congress was suffering under the influence of the formidable crisis into which continental Europe had been plunged by the senseless demands made on Germany by the. Entente. Thus the general interest was occupied by Western rather than Eastern politics. Above all, the representations which came from Moscow, and which decisively denied any invasion of Georgia by the Russian! Army, served to confuse the judgment. It is not necessary to subject these representations to a detailed examination, as they answer themselves by their contradictions and inconsistencies. 99