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Georgia, a social-democratic peasant republic, impressions and observations
Image 92
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Kautsky, Karl, 1854-1938. Georgia, a social-democratic peasant republic, impressions and observations - Image 92. 1921. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 27, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3970/show/3945.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kautsky, Karl, 1854-1938. (1921). Georgia, a social-democratic peasant republic, impressions and observations - Image 92. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3970/show/3945

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kautsky, Karl, 1854-1938, Georgia, a social-democratic peasant republic, impressions and observations - Image 92, 1921, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 27, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3970/show/3945.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Georgia, a social-democratic peasant republic, impressions and observations
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Kautsky, Karl, 1854-1938
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Stenning, H. J. (Henry James), 1889-, translator
Publisher International Bookshops
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London, England
Date 1921
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Georgia
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 111, [1] pages; 19 cm
Original Item Location DK5ll.G3K3 1921
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304504~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Public Domain: This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 92
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2669984_091.jpg
Transcript Denikin against the Bolshevists. These overtures too were definitely rejected by the Georgian, Government, which continued to maintain the strictest neutrality. That was not easy, as the conflicting classes in Russia adopted the attitude of who is not for us is against us. The democratic country, which had expropriated the ground landlords, was a thorn in the side of the Generals of the counter revolution. The Republic seemed to be not less inconvenient to the men of the Soviet Republic, if for other reasons. They hated Georgian Menshevism right heartily. Both the dictators who: aimed at restoring Czardom, and the People's Commissaries could not bear to think that within their orbit was a free and independent community, which would not obey the dictates of Moscow. A great part of the fighting between the Bolshevists and the white troops took place on the northern borders of Georgia. Sometimes the one and sometimes the other side, whichever happened to be victorious, attempted to subdue the free mountain peoples of the Caucasus, and occasionally invaded Georgia, in order either to set up the re-action, or to provoke a Communist rebellion, which would lead to submission to the Moscow regime. At first it was the Bolshevists who, without any declaration of war, invaded the coastline of Georgia, in the autumn of 1918 and captured Sukhum. The Georgian forces pressed them back. The Bolshevists were soon followed by Denikin's forces, who* seized the territory which had been wrested from: Georgia by the former. Georgia endeavoured to negotiate, but Denikin was not disposed to do so. He advanced, but was at length thrown, back, like the Bolshevists. The intervention of the English succeeded in restoring peace. In the following year the white troops tried to subdue the mountain peoples in the northern Caucasus, who had won their independence. Georgia remained neutral, but its sympathies lay with those who had been attacked 90