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Georgia, a social-democratic peasant republic, impressions and observations
Image 76
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Kautsky, Karl, 1854-1938. Georgia, a social-democratic peasant republic, impressions and observations - Image 76. 1921. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 27, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3970/show/3929.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kautsky, Karl, 1854-1938. (1921). Georgia, a social-democratic peasant republic, impressions and observations - Image 76. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3970/show/3929

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kautsky, Karl, 1854-1938, Georgia, a social-democratic peasant republic, impressions and observations - Image 76, 1921, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 27, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3970/show/3929.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Georgia, a social-democratic peasant republic, impressions and observations
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Kautsky, Karl, 1854-1938
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Stenning, H. J. (Henry James), 1889-, translator
Publisher International Bookshops
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London, England
Date 1921
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Georgia
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 111, [1] pages; 19 cm
Original Item Location DK5ll.G3K3 1921
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304504~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Public Domain: This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 76
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2669984_075.jpg
Transcript aroused against them the lowest instincts of the, proletariat. In! Georgia, the! expropriators, as well as the expropriated, have been spared this mutual degradation. The expropriated have likewise refrained from any attempt to resist their, fate. Thel alternative which confronted them—the Bolshevist regime—was too terrible. Feudal' lords belong to' the past. The capitalist constitutes the exploiting power of the present. We have already seen why their political power in Georgia was negligible. Only a few of them are engaged in industry, and most of therm represent the parasitic forms of capitalism—as usurers, profiteers, and landlords in towns. Among them, Armenians preponderate, and they are not loved by the Georgian people. The cause of this antagonism is described differently by each side, but the underlying facts remain the same. Interpretation's of the facts differ. The one side despises the Armenians as dirty, unscrupulous traders and usurers; the other side declares the Armenians are thrifty and industrious. The Georgians, on the other hand, have retained too much feudal carelessness and love of enjoyment. Therefore, the Armenians maintain oxer them an economic advantage. Besides Armenians, there are Germans, Russians, Italians- and Jews (who are considered a special nationality in Georgia) and members of other foreign nations among the capitalists, but few members of the Georgian, nation. The result of all this is that the frequent great dissatisfaction of the capitalists with the present regime finds noi echo among the population, which, on the contrary, rejoices when they are severely treated. In capitalist circles, complaint was made that unreasonable measures were often adopted, so that, not merely were the parasitic activities of capital restricted, but obstacles were set up to its functioning in cases where it promotes the development of the productive forces. So far as I was able to investigate such 74