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China in revolt
Image 61
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China in revolt - Image 61. 1926?. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 19, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3853/show/3845.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1926?). China in revolt - Image 61. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3853/show/3845

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

China in revolt - Image 61, 1926?, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 19, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3853/show/3845.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title China in revolt
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Communist International. Executive Committee
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Chicago, Illinois
Date 1926?
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • China
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 64 pages; 15 cm
Original Item Location HX744.C441
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304514~S5
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 61
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_9470927_060.jpg
Transcript I I peasant question is bound to be closely bound up with the agrarian question, that is, the land question. The extent to which these questions are interwoven with one another, and their relations to one another, are extremely difficult to ascertain. I shall therefore draw your attention, comrades, to only one comprehensive table, thus avoiding the necessity of quoting to you the whole of the figures for the separate provinces, which I am afraid would cause you to send me to China to gather more exact statistical information. (Laughter). 49,5 per cent of all farming undertakings consists of plots varying from 1 to 20 Mu in area. (If I am not mistaken, 1 Mu corresponds to a sixteenth of our des- jatine. The desjatine is 2,5 acres.) These diminutive farms represent 15 to 16% of the total arable land. One half of the peasant population thus cultivates only about 16% of the total land. The Chinese regard pieces of land of 20 to 40 Mu as small farms; and such farms are owned by 23% of the peasant families, their land amounting to about 22% of the total area of the country. 15% of the families possess land to the extent of 40 to 75 Mu and 25% of the total land. 11% of the families own large farms of over 75 Mu, and thus possess 35,9%, in round figures 36%, of the total area. This characterizes the differentiation in the position of the peasants. In order to complete this survey, I must state that although China, taken on the whole, is a country of small farms, still there is a considerable quantity of land in the hands of large owners; and the conditions here obtaining are characteristically those of large land ownership. Large tracts of country are in the hands of the remnants of the onetime feudal landowning official bureaucrats, or in the hands of the present Generals. There are about 200 landowners each owning an area of more than ten thousand Mu. It may be assumed that there are about 30,000 landowners each owning more than one thousand Mu. You must understand, comrades, that when 59