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China in revolt
Image 38
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China in revolt - Image 38. 1926?. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 17, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3853/show/3822.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1926?). China in revolt - Image 38. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3853/show/3822

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

China in revolt - Image 38, 1926?, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 17, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3853/show/3822.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title China in revolt
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Communist International. Executive Committee
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Chicago, Illinois
Date 1926?
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • China
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 64 pages; 15 cm
Original Item Location HX744.C441
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304514~S5
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 38
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_9470927_037.jpg
Transcript And the same Holl complains with lyrical sorrow, that no such institution as the League of Nations prevails in the Pacific: "The League of Nations, despite its shortcomings, is a body that tries to be of service in international questions (!). Yet it is impossible to turn to the League of Nations in any more important conflict because the United States is not a member." It is, of course, an entirely debatable question as to how far the League of Nations can be an instrument "for settlement of international conflicts". Yet it is extraordinarily symptomatic of the entire international situation that it is just the Pacific Ocean which is not subject to the influence of even so powerless an institution like the European League of Nations. The notorious Washington Conference (1921) gave rise to certain pacifist illusions, because it put a check on the growth of naval armaments. Yet it eliminated neither the cause nor the chances of the conflict, it merely deferred them. Prior to this conference, American imperialism worked tirelessly and persistently on the strengthening of its military-strategical positions in the fight for the Pacific, for the markets of the Far East. In 1898, as a result of the Spanish-American war, the Americans took Cuba from the Spaniards, an Island near the shores of Central America and the key to the Atlantic side of the future Panama Canal. At the same time, the United States annexed also another Island, Porto Rico, which is of great importance in guarding the entrance of the Panama Canal. An additional result of the Spanish-American war was the annexation of the Philippines at the entrance of the South China Sea, on the Asiatic shores of the Pacific Ocean. The Philippines can be compared to a revolver, the muzzle of which is pointed at Japan. The revolver is dangerous, because at the very opening of 36