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Socialism summed up
Image 104
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Hillquit, Morris, 1869-1933. Socialism summed up - Image 104. 1913. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/377/show/364.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Hillquit, Morris, 1869-1933. (1913). Socialism summed up - Image 104. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/377/show/364

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Hillquit, Morris, 1869-1933, Socialism summed up - Image 104, 1913, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/377/show/364.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Socialism summed up
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Hillquit, Morris, 1869-1933
Publisher The H. K. Fly Co.
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York
Date 1913
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Socialism
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 110 pages: illustrations; 20 cm.
Original Item Location HX86.H77 1914
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304545~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 104
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2100825_103.jpg
Transcript 102 SOCIALISM SUMMED UP In the Presidential elections of 1912 the political strength of American Socialism was subjected to a most severe test. For the first time in the history of American politics the voters were confronted by a party similar in type to the "liberal" or "radical" parties of the European bourgeoisie. The National Progressive Party made its campaign on a platform of broad social and political reform. It purloined a large number of minor planks from the Socialist program and even adopted many time-honored Socialist watch-words and slogans. The new party was organized and led by Theodore Roosevelt, the most popular man in the country and probably its most skilled politician, and his picturesque fight as well as the great prestige of his recent high office, could not fail to commend his party to the radicals and reformers of the country and to large masses of the workers. It offered the logical outlet to the proverbial vote of "discontent and protest." Under these conditions the vote of the Socialist Party was from the outset limited to thoroughgoing Socialists. It was therefore all the more significant, when it was found that the vote cast for Eugene V. Debs on November 5, 1912, was in the neighborhood of 900,000. The Socialist Party had doubled its vote of the preceding Presidential election under the most adverse circumstances, and had proved itself an established factor in American politics. At the present time the Socialists control between