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Socialism summed up
Image 87
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Hillquit, Morris, 1869-1933. Socialism summed up - Image 87. 1913. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/377/show/347.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Hillquit, Morris, 1869-1933. (1913). Socialism summed up - Image 87. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/377/show/347

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Hillquit, Morris, 1869-1933, Socialism summed up - Image 87, 1913, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/377/show/347.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Socialism summed up
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Hillquit, Morris, 1869-1933
Publisher The H. K. Fly Co.
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York
Date 1913
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Socialism
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 110 pages: illustrations; 20 cm.
Original Item Location HX86.H77 1914
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304545~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 87
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2100825_086.jpg
Transcript ACCOMPLISHMENTS OF MOVEMENT 85 administration of cities in all progressive countries of the world, is largely due to the Socialist example. Even in the United States, Milwaukee, Schenectady, . Berkeley, and Butte have established standards of municipal administration, which are rapidly beginning to force other cities into the path of social progress. These, then, are the most conspicuous of the "direct" political achievements of Socialism. They constitute a distinct social advance, although they are not revolutionary or epoch-making in character. Far more significant than the direct results are the numerous measures of social legislation which have within the last generation been enacted by the law-giving bodies of almost all civilized countries, as the indirect but nevertheless legitimate results of the Socialist propaganda. Such measures of social reform are, as a rule, originally formulated by the Socialist parties on radical and thoroughgoing lines. They become the object of a persistent and widespread propaganda, and finally they acquire the force of popular demands. At this stage the "progressive" and sometimes even the "conservative" statesmen of the dominant political parties begin to realize the political significance of the proposed measure. The Vox Populi means votes on election day, and the shrewd leaders of the old parties are quite willing to make an occasional concession to "social justice" in order to maintain or to gain political power. A classical example of such statesmanship may be found in the very recent politi-