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Socialism summed up
Image 47
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Hillquit, Morris, 1869-1933. Socialism summed up - Image 47. 1913. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 18, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/377/show/307.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Hillquit, Morris, 1869-1933. (1913). Socialism summed up - Image 47. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/377/show/307

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Hillquit, Morris, 1869-1933, Socialism summed up - Image 47, 1913, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 18, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/377/show/307.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Socialism summed up
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Hillquit, Morris, 1869-1933
Publisher The H. K. Fly Co.
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York
Date 1913
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Socialism
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 110 pages: illustrations; 20 cm.
Original Item Location HX86.H77 1914
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304545~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 47
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2100825_046.jpg
Transcript THE METHODS OF SOCIALISM 45 only when its adherents, sympathizers and supporters, are numerous enough to wrest the machinery of government from their opponents, and to use it for the realization of their program. The only previous time in the history of the United States that the country could boast of a political party with a social program was when the Republican Party was first organized for the abolition of slavery, and that program was not realized until the party was strong enough to win a national election. The Civil War does not alter this cardinal fact. It simply meant that the minority was not ready to give up without a fight, but if the abolitionists had not been in control of the government there would obviously be no provocation for the fight and no chance for the victory. Experience has demonstrated that as soon as the Socialist Party develops menacing political strength, all non-Socialist parties combine against it. Milwaukee is not the only illustration of this tendency. The same practice has been followed in all countries of Europe in which the Socialist movement is an important political factor, and will in time undoubtedly become the accepted rule in the United States. To be victorious, the Socialists will, therefore, in all likelihood require an absolute majority of the voters and the population. Not necessarily an absolute majority of trained Socialist thinkers and workers, but a majority of persons generally ready to cast their fortunes with the Socialist movement.