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Socialism summed up
Image 29
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Hillquit, Morris, 1869-1933. Socialism summed up - Image 29. 1913. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/377/show/289.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Hillquit, Morris, 1869-1933. (1913). Socialism summed up - Image 29. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/377/show/289

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Hillquit, Morris, 1869-1933, Socialism summed up - Image 29, 1913, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/377/show/289.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Socialism summed up
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Hillquit, Morris, 1869-1933
Publisher The H. K. Fly Co.
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York
Date 1913
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Socialism
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 110 pages: illustrations; 20 cm.
Original Item Location HX86.H77 1914
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304545~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 29
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2100825_028.jpg
Transcript THE SOCIALIST AIM 27 munity of goods and equality of reward, and Social- 2 ism which has not the remotest kinship with it. ' Another source of persistent misinterpretation lurks in the term "public" or "collective" ownership as used in the formulation of the Socialist program. The superficial critics of the Socialist philosophy invariably identify that expression with "government ownership," and thence jump at the conclusion that the Socialists contemplate a state of society in which all industries of the country, large and small, will be operated and directed from one great national center. This is the origin and foundation of the bugaboo of "Socialist paternalism and tryanny." Not so long ago, Mr. David M. Parry, one time president of the National Manufacturers' Association, wrote a novel entitled "The Scarlet Empire," and mainly centering around a description of "the Socialist state" as the author conceived it. It was a horrible state. Governmental regulation was the rule in all private and public pursuits of the citizens. The government fixed the occupation of each person, prepared a uniform menu for all inhabitants from day to day, prescribed the fashion, cut and pattern of their dress, and regulated their routine of daily life, their religion, marriages and amusements. It was a reign of relentless tyranny, a life of insufferable uniformity and monotony. Mr. Parry had set himself the task of conjuring a picture of an order of society even more oppressive than our present regime, and he almost succeeded.