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The New phase in the Soviet Union
Image 32
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Molotov, Vyacheslav Mikhaylovich, 1890-1986. The New phase in the Soviet Union - Image 32. 1931. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 20, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3712/show/3683.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Molotov, Vyacheslav Mikhaylovich, 1890-1986. (1931). The New phase in the Soviet Union - Image 32. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3712/show/3683

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Molotov, Vyacheslav Mikhaylovich, 1890-1986, The New phase in the Soviet Union - Image 32, 1931, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 20, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3712/show/3683.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The New phase in the Soviet Union
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Molotov, Vyacheslav Mikhaylovich, 1890-1986
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Communist International. Executive Committee
Publisher Workers Library Publishers
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1931
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Politics and government
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 55, [1] pages; 22 cm
Original Item Location DK267.M6242
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8321015~S5
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 32
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_14582000_031.jpg
Transcript already assured. Equally symptomatic is the circulation of our newspapers. I will quote the example of the Krestyanskaya Gazeta (Peasant Newspaper), the newspaper most popular in the countryside. It is published twice weekly, with a circulation of 1,750,000. In connection with the spring sowing campaign, a special issue of this paper came out in ioi million copies, and this quantity did nol satisfy the whole demand. Very often we have to take artificial steps to limit the print of our newspapers and books, as, in spite of the rapid development of our paper production, we are suffering from an acute paper famine. The facts I have cited are evidence that socialist construction is being accompanied and consolidated by the cultural progress of the working masses. Without that progress, socialism could not be built on firm foundations. This cultural progress is most closely bound up with the changes now taking place in the social and living conditions of the workers and peasants. The break-up of the system of petty individual economy in the villages brings with it radical alterations in the peasants' living conditions. The consolidation of socialised economy will involve the rapid development of various socialised forms of living conditions in the countryside. Socialist construction in the towns raises even more acutely the question of changing the living conditions of the working men and women. The importance of housing and consumers' co-operation is growing, particularly as regards the development of public dining rooms. Arising out of the building of our gigantic new factories, we are already faced with the practical question of building new cities of a socialist type. For example, in the districts where the vast tractor works at Stalingrad (Tractorostroi) and the new giant metallurgical works in the Urals (Magnitostroi) are being built, provision is being made for the erection of new large settlements which are in fact cities of a new type. A lively discussion of these new problems of social life is developing. Particularly important is the introduction in our factories and offices of the so-called "continuous working week," i.e., four days' work and one day's rest. While as a result of this change the number of rest days of the individual worker has certainly not decreased, work goes on in the factories and offices all the year round, apart from the five days of the main revolutionary holidays. This increases the work of the factories by 60 days a year and hastens the absorption of the unemployed. By now 53, per cent, of the industrial workers are working the continuous week, while in some branches of industry, e.g., coal mining and electrical engineering, the overwhelming majority of the undertakings have completed the transition. The introduction of the four-day working week in all institutions, it must be mentioned, has taken place 30