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The New phase in the Soviet Union
Image 28
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Molotov, Vyacheslav Mikhaylovich, 1890-1986. The New phase in the Soviet Union - Image 28. 1931. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 12, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3712/show/3679.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Molotov, Vyacheslav Mikhaylovich, 1890-1986. (1931). The New phase in the Soviet Union - Image 28. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3712/show/3679

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Molotov, Vyacheslav Mikhaylovich, 1890-1986, The New phase in the Soviet Union - Image 28, 1931, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 12, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3712/show/3679.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The New phase in the Soviet Union
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Molotov, Vyacheslav Mikhaylovich, 1890-1986
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Communist International. Executive Committee
Publisher Workers Library Publishers
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1931
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Politics and government
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 55, [1] pages; 22 cm
Original Item Location DK267.M6242
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8321015~S5
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 28
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_14582000_027.jpg
Transcript Sufficient has been said of this also. Now I must dwell, in the most general way, on what rendered possible such an advance amongst the great mass of the peasantry. 2. THE VILLAGE TURNS TO SOCIALISM. The entry of the peasant masses on the road of collectivisation was the result of all the work of the Party and the soviet government in recent years. The soviet system alone, rendering possible as it does the drawing of great masses of the workers into the task of building socialism, could create the necessary conditions for this historic change. Only as a result of greatly increased confidence of the working masses in the villages towards the soviet government and the policy of the C.P.S.U. could this change take place in the opinions of the peasantry. The change is founded, first of all, on our great successes in the restoration and reconstruction of industry on socialist lines ; secondly, on the successful application of the policy of limiting the growth of capitalist elements, and, particularly in recent years, of intensified attack on the kulaks while simultaneously and systematically granting the utmost government assistance to the poor and middle peasant farms; thirdly, on the rapid development in the last two years of the soviet and larg'e collective farms, and the utilisation of tractors and complex agricultural machinery, which have greatly quickened the g-eneral realisation amongst the peasantry of the advantages of large-scale socialist agriculture. Naturally, the successes here enumerated should be taken in conjunction with the whole political and educational work of the Party in the village and amongst the workers. Once this is realised we can understand what is going on in the villages. At the same time it must be clear that none of this could take place without a vast and unprecedented expansion of the activity of the peasants themselves in the socialist reconstruction of agriculture. Without this, no influence from above, no agitation, no skill in mass organisation could adequately explain the mass collectivisation which now covers tens of thousands of villages. True, when the collectivisation plans are being applied there are cases of over-zealousness for administrative methods among our workers. In the scramble to have the most advanced district, attempts are sometimes made to replace by mere pressure from above the real work of genuinely preparing the masses for collectivisation. This might result in waverings amongst certain sections of the peasantry who have already moved in the direction of the collective farms. Such events can inflict tremendous damage on the collective farming movement, and consequently the Party carries on a determined battle against them. However, it would be foolish not to see the wood for the trees, and to fail 26