Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
The New phase in the Soviet Union
Image 13
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Molotov, Vyacheslav Mikhaylovich, 1890-1986. The New phase in the Soviet Union - Image 13. 1931. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 16, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3712/show/3664.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Molotov, Vyacheslav Mikhaylovich, 1890-1986. (1931). The New phase in the Soviet Union - Image 13. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3712/show/3664

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Molotov, Vyacheslav Mikhaylovich, 1890-1986, The New phase in the Soviet Union - Image 13, 1931, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 16, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3712/show/3664.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title The New phase in the Soviet Union
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Molotov, Vyacheslav Mikhaylovich, 1890-1986
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Communist International. Executive Committee
Publisher Workers Library Publishers
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1931
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Politics and government
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 55, [1] pages; 22 cm
Original Item Location DK267.M6242
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8321015~S5
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 13
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_14582000_012.jpg
Transcript In the first, their object was to preserve the property of the former owners and delay the development of soviet industry. In the second, when the new economic policy began, the wreckers conceived illusions about the economic degeneration of the proletarian state, and set themselves the task of undermining the process of restoring industry and of extending the granting of concessions, expecting in this way to hasten the downfall of bolshevism. When we had grappled successfully with the problems involved in the restoration of industry, and set about the total reconstruction of our national economy, they saw the futility of their efforts and began the direct preparation of intervention. In this they received constant support from the Russian and foreign organisations of former property owners abroad. We have numerous and extremely detailed evidence of all this from the saboteurs themselves and from the counter-revolutionary organisations crushed by G.P.U. Unquestionably the destructive organisations in industry represented one of the most dangerous forms of struggle on the part of our class enemies. They inflicted many severe blows on our industry. Nevertheless, the agents of the former owners and bourgeois governments suffered defeat, as the tremendous successes of socialist industry can testify. Now, comrades, we can srike a balance of our industrial development, and the best way of doing it is to compare it with the development of industry in the capitalist states. As the watchword of the working class in the Soviet Union is to "overtake and outstrip" the capitalist countries, such a comparison is exceptionally important. Let us compare the development of industry in the Soviet Union and the largest capitalist countries in its relation to the pre-war level of 1913. We find that in comparison with the pre-war level, the U.S.S.R. has achieved greater successes than even France and the U.S.A., which developed most rapidly after the world war. The comparison shows that as early as 1928 the Soviet Union had already outpaced France, while during the second half of last year it outstripped the industry of the U.S.A. During the last months of 1929 the so-called physical volume of industrial output in the U.S.S.R., compared with 1913, surpassed the similar index of any capitalist country. Consequently we have here the partial achievement of the objective of "overtaking and outstripping" the capitalist countries. This is the most important result of industrial development in the U.S.S.R. We cannot, however, by any means rest content with the results achieved so far. A more careful analysis of the growth of Soviet industry, mentioned above, reveals most important shortcomings. The fact is that the level of the growth of our heavy industry, compared with the pre-war figure, is still lower than the corres- 11 I