Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Correspondence with the Russian Soviet government
Image 5
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Correspondence with the Russian Soviet government - Image 5. 1922. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 3, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3651/show/3645.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1922). Correspondence with the Russian Soviet government - Image 5. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3651/show/3645

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Correspondence with the Russian Soviet government - Image 5, 1922, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 3, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3651/show/3645.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Correspondence with the Russian Soviet government
Alternative Title Parliament. Papers by command. Cmd. 1602.
Series Title Russia, no. 1 (1922)
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Great Britain. Foreign Office
  • Institut des langues orientales (Russia)
Publisher H.M. Stationary Office
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London, England
Date 1922
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • International relations
Subject.Name (Local)
  • Harding, Stan, Mrs.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • United Kingdom
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 9 pages; 24 cm
Original Item Location JX758.G75 1922
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304421~S5
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Public Domain: This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 5
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_13911972_004.jpg
Transcript nient with the Extraordinary Commission. He replied : " It is quite simple, Madam ; because you will never leave the cell where you are now except to suffer the penalty of espionage in war-time—unless we hold you in our power." 6. Mrs Harding was next accused of having assisted Mrs. Harrison (then representing the " Baltimore Sun " in Moscow) to obtain certain information, knowing that she was in the Secret Service. Mrs. Harding denied that she knew Mrs. Harrison was in the Secret Service, and said that any information she had given to Mrs. Harrison was of such a nature that it was in the interests of German Socialists and of the British and American public to have it. 7. A second and third interrogation followed at later dates, at the close of which Mogilevsky said: " Your case is closed. I have done what I can to save you, but you refuse to help me, and you have decided that you will remain faithful to the British Intelligence Service, and I can do nothing." She then applied for a trial, to which he replied that she would never be tried. 8. Mrs. Harding was imprisoned in solitary confinement for nine weeks, and was not allowed books or any other literature. The food provided daily during that time was described by her as tea or coffee —she was not sure which it was meant to be—1 lb. of black bread, herring soup twice a day, which she described as simply hot water with herring skins and eyes in it. A plate of porridge was occasionally provided. 9. The effect of solitary confinement for so long a time under conditions of such squalor and privation induced Mrs. Harding to decide that she would endeavour to concoct a story that she had been requested to obtain certain information on the raw materials of Russia from a fictitious Russian, who, she was informed, would introduce himself to her by a password when she got to Russia. By this subterfuge she succeeded in gaining access to M. Chicherin, who, however, left the room without listening to her appeal. 10. In September Mrs. Harding, as the result of frequent hunger- striking, was removed to the Butirka prison for a week, where conditions were better and medical aid was provided. Shortly afterwards she was subjected to further examinations, at the end of which Mogilevsky said: " The only condition upon which anyone in your position is ever released is that you undertake to help us in counterespionage, and that you give a written declaration that you are prepared to do so." He explained to her that she would be required to act as a decoy to newly-arrived journalists, with a view to eliciting their real sentiments with regard to the Soviet Government. This Mrs. Harding declined to do. 11. Ten days later she again endeavoured to obtain a transfer from the Lubianka (to which she had been sent back) to another prison, whereupon she was told that great leniency had been shown her in not shooting her, but that there was no reason to transfer her to another prison where the conditions were better. She was again asked to produce a document by which the Soviet Government could obtain a hold over her. Finally, Mrs. Stan Harding was transferred to the Butirka prison once more, where she made the acquaintance of a British subject, Miss Maxwell, who had been imprisoned by the Soviet Government on the ground of her alleged participation in a [7(147] B 2