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Correspondence with the Russian Soviet government
Image 4
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Correspondence with the Russian Soviet government - Image 4. 1922. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 3, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3651/show/3644.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1922). Correspondence with the Russian Soviet government - Image 4. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3651/show/3644

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Correspondence with the Russian Soviet government - Image 4, 1922, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 3, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3651/show/3644.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Correspondence with the Russian Soviet government
Alternative Title Parliament. Papers by command. Cmd. 1602.
Series Title Russia, no. 1 (1922)
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Great Britain. Foreign Office
  • Institut des langues orientales (Russia)
Publisher H.M. Stationary Office
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London, England
Date 1922
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • International relations
Subject.Name (Local)
  • Harding, Stan, Mrs.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • United Kingdom
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 9 pages; 24 cm
Original Item Location JX758.G75 1922
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304421~S5
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Public Domain: This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 4
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_13911972_003.jpg
Transcript 4 the British Secret Service. In reply, Mogilevsky jeered at her, and told her to "tell that to her grandmother.' He appeared to base his charges against her on the following grounds :— (1.) That in 1911 to 1912 she had proceeded to China at a time when, he asserted, the country was closed to Europeans, and she must therefore have been engaged upon some secret work. (2.) That in the course of the year 1918, prior to the armistice. she proceeded to Germany, which lie regarded as indicating that she was employed on secret intelligence service. (3.) Upon an article written by one Sel'ton Delmar, published in the " Daily News," suggesting that her activities in Germany were of far greater importance than was generally known. (4.) A telegram received by Mrs. Harding from Mr. Tuohy, the London representative of the " New York World," engaging her for that paper, stating what her salary would be, and that lie was sending her copies of telegrams from Lincoln Eyre, who had previously been the correspondent of the paper in Russia, as a guide to the sort of copy that lie wanted. (5) That Lincoln Lyre had led Comrade Balabauova (a female member of the Petrograd Soviet, formerly an exile in Switzerland, and now a secretary to the Communist International) to believe that he was a Communist, and had subsequently made reports to the British authorities. 3. Mrs. Harding told Mogilevsky that his suggestions showed complete ignorance of the facts. (1) and (2) appeared to relate to a journey undertaken on the Upper Yang-tsze during the Chinese rebellion and to a journey in Germany in the autumn of 1918 for the purpose of obtaining a divorce from her husband, a German subject, from whom she had been separated for years. 4. Mrs. Harding asked to see M. Chicherin, to which Mogilevsky replied that the Minister for Foreign Affairs did not concern himself with espionage, finally adding, " You will never see Chicherin unless you come to terms with me, and the less you say about your introductions the better, because it is these introductions that make your case so very grave. They show that you possess the confidence of the German Socialists and the Communist leaders, and are therefore in a position to be a danger to us. If you tell us your mission and denounce your accomplices you will be released and allowed to live exactly as other journalists, only we shall require an undertaking from^you that you do not concern yourself with the Third International, and if you break this undertaking you will he immediately rearrested." 5. Mrs. Harding again protested that she was not an agent and had no accomplices. Mogilevsky then offered to introduce her to two Entente agents, who, he said, were very well known ; and when she said that she did not know their names, he added that she was lying and that these agents would tell her that the Extraordinary Commission kept its promises. She then asked him how he felt himself in a position to inform her that these people had come to an arrauge-