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Correspondence between His Majesty's government and the Soviet government
Image 10
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Correspondence between His Majesty's government and the Soviet government - Image 10. 1923. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 30, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3603/show/3600.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1923). Correspondence between His Majesty's government and the Soviet government - Image 10. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3603/show/3600

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Correspondence between His Majesty's government and the Soviet government - Image 10, 1923, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 30, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3603/show/3600.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Correspondence between His Majesty's government and the Soviet government
Alternative Title Parliament. Papers by command. Cmd. 1874.
Series Title Russia, no. 1 (1923)
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Great Britain. Foreign Office
  • Institut des langues orientales (Russia)
Publisher H.M. Stationary Office
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London, England
Date 1923
Subject.Name (Local)
  • Davison, Charles Frederick
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 12 pages; 25 cm
Original Item Location JX638.R9 1920
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8302910~S5
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Public Domain: This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 10
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_13841551_009.jpg
Transcript 10 construction can be put upon this, namely that the Social Revolutionaries were determined to have the prisoners executed. In all fairness to Zimin, he declared himself opposed to the proposal of Funtikof, but the latter, supported by Kurilef, insisted on carrying it through. To the host of my belief, the murders were actually carried out by Kurilef and a party of men sent by the Krasnovodsk authorities. As regards the charges against myself. These were raised in the first place by one Vadim Chaikin, himself a renegade Social Revolutionary. Chaikin took upon himself to go across to Trans- easpia in the early spring of 1919. where lie interviewed Funtikof in the Askhabad jail. During the interview Funtikof is alleged to have made a detailed statement charging me with having demanded and instigated the murder of the commissars. Chaikin accepted Funtikof's statements as true, and with them as a basis commenced a very wide campaign in the press against the British in general and myself in particular. His object in doing this was doubtless firstly self-advertisement, and secondly a desire to draw the attention of the Soviet authorities from the real culprits, who were his own party comrades, by fastening the blame on the British. If cheap notoriety counts for anything, Chaikin has certainly succeeded in the first, but has failed in the second, for the Bolsheviks have executed all the persons whoso names have in any way figured in connection with the crime. As to the Soviet Government, they have found the allegations of Chaikin an extremely useful handle against the British Government. Not being hampered with any feelings of justice, they have found it advisable to accept the statements of Chaikin without making any attempt to sift them. This is regrettable, as, had they done so, the jackal Chaikin with all his cheap notoriety would have doubtless suffered the fate of many hundreds of thousands of his fellow-countrymen. Perhaps the Soviet Government will even yet realise how thoroughly ridiculous he has made them appear in that even the official organ of the Soviets, the Moscow "Izvestia." has permitted itself on more than one occasion to publish calumnious attacks on myself, based on the false allegations of Vadim Chaikin. (Vide Moscow " Izvestia." No. 85 (637) of the 28th April, 1919. and the 7th March, 1922.) In conclusion. Sir, I am fully aware that in the absence of a civilised and responsible Government in Russia it is out of the question to hope for any redress, but inasmuch as the present charges have arisen in connection with the discharge of my duties as a British official, I do claim the protection and support of His Majesty's Foreign Office in— 1. Repudiation in entirety of the charges made against me. 2. Demanding the suppression of the book recently published by Vadim Chaikin on the subject of the above murders. 3. Demanding unqualified disavowal by the Soviet Government of the charges in question.