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Correspondence between His Majesty's government and the Soviet government
Image 9
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Correspondence between His Majesty's government and the Soviet government - Image 9. 1923. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 30, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3603/show/3599.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1923). Correspondence between His Majesty's government and the Soviet government - Image 9. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3603/show/3599

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Correspondence between His Majesty's government and the Soviet government - Image 9, 1923, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 30, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3603/show/3599.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Correspondence between His Majesty's government and the Soviet government
Alternative Title Parliament. Papers by command. Cmd. 1874.
Series Title Russia, no. 1 (1923)
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Great Britain. Foreign Office
  • Institut des langues orientales (Russia)
Publisher H.M. Stationary Office
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London, England
Date 1923
Subject.Name (Local)
  • Davison, Charles Frederick
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 12 pages; 25 cm
Original Item Location JX638.R9 1920
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8302910~S5
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Public Domain: This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 9
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_13841551_008.jpg
Transcript 9 declined to take over the prisoners, or, at any rate, had expressed his disinclination to do so, and had told the Askhabad representative that their Government must make its own arrangements. It was then argued that the local prison was full, that Krasnovodsk had refused to keep the prisoners for the same reason, and that therefore there was no alternative but to shoot them. This suggestion was opposed by Zimin, but was supported by Funtikof and Kurilef. The arguments continued endlessly, and finally I left the meeting before anything had really been definitely decided. It was not until the next evening that after closely questioning Funtikof, the latter informed me in confidence that it had been finally decided to shoot the prisoners, and that he, Funtikof, had despatched Kurilef to Krasnovodsk the previous night to make the necessary arrangements. On hearing this, I immediately wired General Malleson accordingly (telegram of the 19th September). It was not until three days later that I was able to elicit definite information from Funtikof, but upon obtaining his statement that "the majority of the prisoners had been quietly shot," I immediately wired General Malleson in these exact terms (telegram of the 23rd September). So much for the actual facts of the case. Now the points which I particularly wish to emphasise are :— 1. The commissars arrived in Krasnovodsk in a Russian ship, and were taken over and imprisoned by the local Russian authorities. 2. General Malleson told Comrade Dokhof that he wished the prisoners to be handed over to him, yet President Funtikof told mo that General Malleson was not willing to take over the prisoners. Either Dokhof lied to Funtikof. or else the latter lied to me. 3. The fate of the prisoners was discussed and decided upon by the Russian authorities in Askhabad, without any interference on the part of the British. 4. The execution was carried out secretly by the Russians without informing the British. Had it not been for the fact that I dragged the information from the drink-sodden Funtikof, I should have known nothing about it until some time afterwards. The above facts are sufficiently clear to show the impossibility of my having had even the remotest connection with the crime. There is. however, one further point to which I would like to draw attention. In my opinion it is more than significant that the persons mainly concerned in the fate of the commissars were all members of the Social Revolutionary Party, e.g., Funtikof, Kurilef, Zimin, Dokhof. Dorrer, and Kuhn in Krasnovodsk, as well as other members of the Krasnovodsk Committee whose names are not known to me. The fact of General Malleson's answer being deliberately suppressed or misquoted is also extremely significant. Only one