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Correspondence between His Majesty's government and the Soviet government
Image 8
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Correspondence between His Majesty's government and the Soviet government - Image 8. 1923. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 30, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3603/show/3598.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1923). Correspondence between His Majesty's government and the Soviet government - Image 8. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3603/show/3598

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Correspondence between His Majesty's government and the Soviet government - Image 8, 1923, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 30, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3603/show/3598.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Correspondence between His Majesty's government and the Soviet government
Alternative Title Parliament. Papers by command. Cmd. 1874.
Series Title Russia, no. 1 (1923)
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Great Britain. Foreign Office
  • Institut des langues orientales (Russia)
Publisher H.M. Stationary Office
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London, England
Date 1923
Subject.Name (Local)
  • Davison, Charles Frederick
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 12 pages; 25 cm
Original Item Location JX638.R9 1920
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8302910~S5
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Public Domain: This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 8
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_13841551_007.jpg
Transcript 8 the charges in question are utterly false, that they are known to the Soviet Government to be false, and that they are without any foundation whatsoever. As I was British political representative in Transcanpia during the period in question, I claim to be thoroughly conversant with the true facts of the case, and welcome this opportunity of setting them forth for your information. They are as follows :— During the defence of Baku against the Turks in the months of August and the first part of September, 1918, a number of Bolshevik commissars, whose presence in Baku was considered dangerous by the authorities then in power, were arrested and placed in confinement. In the general sauce qui pent which attended the fall of Baku on the 13th September, these commissars, twenty-six in number, succeeded in boarding a ship and made for the open sea. Their original intention was to make for Astrakhan, which was in Bolshevik hands, but finding that they had insufficient fuel, they were compelled to make for Krasnovodsk, which was in anti- Bolshevik hands. The commissars were all arrested on landing, and were confined in the local prison. The latter was already overcrowded, and the Krasnovodsk authorities wired to the capital town of Transcaspia, Askhabad, requesting the latter to take over the prisoners. The Askhabad authorities declined to do this on the grounds that their own prison was overcrowded, and sent a wire to their representative in Meshed, one Dokhof, who at this time had been appointed to represent the Transcaspian Government in direct liaison with General Malleson. I am unaware of the contents of this telegram, but suppose it to have been a request to General Malleson to take some action in the matter. I first learned of the arrival in Krasnovodsk of the Bolshevik commissars on the 18th September, 1918, and immediately wired and informed General Malleson. On receipt of my telegram General Malleson discussed with Comrade Dokhof the question of the captured Bolsheviks, and expressed the desire that they should be handed over to the British authorities. Dokhof promised to convey this wish to the Askhabad Government, but expressed the opinion that it was most likely that the prisoners had been shot already. General Malleson then wired me (telegram of the 18th September) to the effect that he had given his instructions to the delegate in Meshed, and asked me to wire what the Government intended to do. That evening the President, Comrade Funtikof, asked me to go to a meeting to discuss the matter, as the Government were undecided as to what action should be taken. I attended the meeting. There were present the President, Funtikof; the Deputy- President, Kurilef; the Foreign Minister, Zimin; and one or two others whom I cannot remember. The committee having assembled, the President (who was in a semi-intoxicated condition) made a statement to the effect that they had been informed from Meshed that General Malleson had