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Women in the Soviet Union
Image 23
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Women in the Soviet Union - Image 23. 1929. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3590/show/3530.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1929). Women in the Soviet Union - Image 23. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3590/show/3530

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Women in the Soviet Union - Image 23, 1929, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3590/show/3530.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Women in the Soviet Union
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Ni︠u︡rina, F. E. (Fanni Efimovna)
Contributor (Local)
  • Alexander, G. G. L.
Publisher Workers Library Publishers
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1929
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Congresses and conventions
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Extent 67 pages: illustrations; 18 cm
Original Item Location HQ1662.W6 1929
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304548~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 23
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_7025254_022.jpg
Transcript SOVIET UNION II raising their cultural and political level if their work were to improve. Peasant women, acting as presidents of village Soviets, said that the work of the Soviets was continually increasing, their importance in economic life continually growing, and that consequently peasant women must work hard to educate themselves and thus fit themselves for carrying out the tasks ahead of them. The delegates stated that the Soviets must deal more thoroughly than previously with the daily and cultural needs of women. They demanded greater attention to the organisation of institutions which would ensure to women more freedom and opportunity^ to take part in public life. The greatest interest was displayed in questions of popular education. The widespread illiteracy and semi- illiteracy among the adult section of the population —a legacy of capitalist society and absolutism—was a source of great sorrow to the women masses of the Union. The legal obligation to wipe out illiteracy, is valid for persons up to the age of 35. Unfortunately the Congress was not in a position to state that the majority of women up to that age had overcome illiteracy. Moreover, the Congress was bound to declare that a great number of women above that age were considerably hindered in their work by illiteracy or semi-illiteracy (some of them can read but not write). Great attention was also devoted by the Congress to the question of preparatory training for young girls. In many peasant families, and fairly often in workers' families, too, the prejudice still exists that a girl does not need to know reading and writing, that she will " get along" anyhow. The Congress decided to combat this and similar prejudices with all possible