Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
The constitution of the Czechoslovak Republic
Image 18
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
The constitution of the Czechoslovak Republic - Image 18. 1920. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 17, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3507/show/3464.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1920). The constitution of the Czechoslovak Republic - Image 18. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3507/show/3464

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The constitution of the Czechoslovak Republic - Image 18, 1920, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 17, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3507/show/3464.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title The constitution of the Czechoslovak Republic
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Hoetzel, Jiří
  • Joachim, V.
Date 1920
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Constitutions
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 53 pages; 26 cm
Original Item Location JN2213 1920.A5
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8302905~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Public Domain
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 18
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_3474827_017.jpg
Transcript In this connection may be also noted the provision of § 55. of the Charter, stipulating that Government decrees (bye-laws) may be issued only on the basis of a law and within its terms. The power to issue orders "praeter legem", as exercised, for instance, in France does not exist here. It is the duty of the Courts to see that this principle is duly observed (§ 102. of the Charter of the Constitution) and they have power to declare as null and void every decree or bye-law which does not conform to the law. GOVERNMENTAL AND EXECUTIVE POWER. This power in its highest aspects is shared between the President of the Republic and the Government. The election of the President is indirect, that is, he is chosen by the two chambers of Parliament assembled in united session. The President enjoys such governmental and executive power as is expressly assigned to him by the Charter of the Constitution or by other laws of the Republic; all other Governmental and executive power rests in the hands of the Government. The functions of the President as set out in § 64. of the Charter of the Constitution are very comprehensive and effective and enable the President to exercise a great influence on the direction of the affairs of the State, without at the same time burdening him with details. As the President of the Republic is not responsible at law for his political acts (except as set forth in § 67 of the Charter), governmental and executive power has been in principle placed in the hands of the responsible factors, that is, the Government. The Constitution expressly introduces the principle of collective responsibility of the Government (§ 75 and 78 of the Charter). A characteristic feature of our Constitution is the effort to secure that all the more important matters of government be settled in a Council of ministers, a cabinet meeting (§§ 80 and 81 of the Charter of the Constitution), the idea being to render it impossible for an individual minister to abuse his position. This effort, as evidenced by the Charter of the Constitution, to ensure a collective and corporate discussion and action in the affairs of government goes so far as to deny to ministers the right of appointing civil servants of the VII and VIII classes: These provisions, too, of the Constitutional Charter are a protection to minorities and aim at assuring an indisturbed and responsible conduct of the affairs of government. Democratisation among us is not confined to legislative authority; one of our great tasks is the democratisation of the public administration, and to this work the foundations have been laid by §86 of the Charter where it is laid down that the civic element shall as far as possible be represented in the subordinate offices of State. The law 16