Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
World voices on the Moscow trials
Image 53
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
American Committee for the Defense of Leon Trotsky. World voices on the Moscow trials - Image 53. 1936?. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 16, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3054/show/3038.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

American Committee for the Defense of Leon Trotsky. (1936?). World voices on the Moscow trials - Image 53. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3054/show/3038

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

American Committee for the Defense of Leon Trotsky, World voices on the Moscow trials - Image 53, 1936?, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 16, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3054/show/3038.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title World voices on the Moscow trials
Alternative Title World voices on the Moscow trials: a compilation from the labor and liberal press of the world
Creator (LCNAF)
  • American Committee for the Defense of Leon Trotsky
Publisher Pioneer Publishers
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1936?
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Trotsky, Leon, 1879-1940
  • Zinovyev, Grigory Yevseyevich, 1883-1936
  • Kamenev, Lev Borisovich, 1883-1936
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Extent 64 pages: 1 illustration; 20 cm
Original Item Location DK266.3.A45
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304404~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 53
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2774257_052.jpg
Transcript trial—which does not testify to the innocence of the accused and the executed. We point only to several examples. Neither the indictment, nor the protocol, nor the prosecutor's speech, nor the sentence, indicates in the slightest way how the existence of this so-called "terrorist center" became known. One might suspect that the conspirators were caught in some act or that some "plans" of a conspiracy were discovered. Nothing about such things are reported. In one single place of the report there is a laconic remark that "on the basis of evidence which has recently come to light in connection with the discovery in 1936 of a series of terrorist groups of Trotskyists and Zinovievists, it is proved that Zinoviev, Kamenev, etc. were also the direct organizers of the murder of Kirov." But what precisely was "the evidence which had recently come to light?" How, through what, and through whom, were a "series of terrorist groups discovered?" It is clear that it is just these questions the answers to which have a special significance for this trial. In the Reichstag Fire Trial, Dimitroff, Tanev, and Popoff could prove their innocence only because the police and witnesses were compelled to state in all detail how they happened to pick up the trail of the accused. Nothing of the sort took place at the Moscow trial. All we know is that one fine day the accused are in prison and are making "confessions." And no one has yet discovered what the particular circumstances were, what the material evidence was, which made these presumable conspirators, these presumable murderers who were capable of anything, confess to the whole history of their intended or realized crimes! For no material evidence is present! Neither incriminating letters nor any other written documents; not even confiscated weapons which, after all, are necessary to the execution of any terrorist crime. But it is not only the material evidence which is conspicuous by its absence in this report of the trial; living witnesses for the misdeeds of the accused are not present. Or at least were not introduced. The one exception, Safanova, the wife of the accused Smirnov, is brought from jail to the prisoner's bar to denounce her "lying" husband. This absence of witnesses for both prosecution and defense is unparallelled—and all the more monstrous because continually questions arise which require confirmation or refutation by witnesses. For example, Olberg tells a highly colored story about a Honduran passport which he used to travel to Russia in order to kill Stalin on Trotsky's orders. Through Tukalevski, the director of the Slavonic Library of the Prague Foreign Office he got the passport, and through his brother, Paul Olberg, he knew that Tukalevski was "an agent of the Fascist secret police." In answer to a supplementary question of the prosecuting attorney, Olberg acknowledges that his brother Paul was "an agent of the Fascist secret police." It is essential to this story that—if not the Director of the Prague Library— at least the brother, Paul Olberg, be called as witness. Furthermore, 51