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World voices on the Moscow trials
Image 49
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American Committee for the Defense of Leon Trotsky. World voices on the Moscow trials - Image 49. 1936?. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 19, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3054/show/3034.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

American Committee for the Defense of Leon Trotsky. (1936?). World voices on the Moscow trials - Image 49. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3054/show/3034

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

American Committee for the Defense of Leon Trotsky, World voices on the Moscow trials - Image 49, 1936?, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 19, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3054/show/3034.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title World voices on the Moscow trials
Alternative Title World voices on the Moscow trials: a compilation from the labor and liberal press of the world
Creator (LCNAF)
  • American Committee for the Defense of Leon Trotsky
Publisher Pioneer Publishers
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1936?
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Trotsky, Leon, 1879-1940
  • Zinovyev, Grigory Yevseyevich, 1883-1936
  • Kamenev, Lev Borisovich, 1883-1936
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Extent 64 pages: 1 illustration; 20 cm
Original Item Location DK266.3.A45
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304404~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 49
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2774257_048.jpg
Transcript trials. For to us the Soviet Union is more than a welcome ally of capitalist states. To us it is the land of coming socialism. It was not the reformists but we, who had set such great store, such great hopes on the Soviet Union for the victory of socialism throughout the world, that were utterly dismayed by the Moscow trials and regarded them as "a terrible misfortune for Socialism throughout the world without distinction of parties and tendencies." The trial took place before the Military Collegium of the Supreme Court. On the defendant's bench there sat a typical "amalgam"—besides old revolutionists, the most intimate friends and co-workers of Lenin, a pair of very questionable characters. The defendants were accused of having organized, together with the agents of Hitler's Gestapo, attempts upon the lives of the leaders of the Soviet Union. In other words they were accused of the gravest crime a revolutionist can commit. All the defendants renounced their rights to counsel—all sixteen without exception chose to appear before the court without the advice or help of counsel. The only proof of guilt offered was the confessions of the defendants. Let us assume for a moment that it really was the case that blind hate against Stalin had misled old revolutionists to the insane and criminal thought that the interest of the revolution demanded the forcible elimination of Stalin. How would such men have conducted themselves before the tribunal. They would have openly declared their conviction and proceeded to justify it. They would have attempted to accuse Stalin before the court of having led the revolution on to a false course and of having become an obstacle to its victory. They would have attempted to transform the trial against themselves into a trial against Stalin. A great many revolutionary terrorists have conducted themselves in this way before bourgeois courts. But not a single one of the sixteen did it. One might object: these sixteen were no revolutionary heroes. In that case one would expect that they would behave in the same way as people of that kind behave throughout the world. They would have denied their guilt and their participation in the conspiracy. At the very least, when confronted by the statements of their confederates, they would have attempted to minimize their participation and pleaded mitigating circumstances. But even that the sixteen did not do. They not only willingly confessed to what the state's attorney accused them. They also confessed that they were actuated by no ideal or political motivation but only by sheer greed for personal power. They called themselves bandits, murderers, traitors. They declared that they justly earned a sentence of death. Whoever has read the report of the trial cannot escape the impression that he is reading about a group of self-flagellating monks—confessions of repentant, crawling, and miserable sinners. Certainly, it is barely possible that one or another of these sixteen 47