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World voices on the Moscow trials
Image 21
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American Committee for the Defense of Leon Trotsky. World voices on the Moscow trials - Image 21. 1936?. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 16, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3054/show/3006.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

American Committee for the Defense of Leon Trotsky. (1936?). World voices on the Moscow trials - Image 21. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3054/show/3006

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

American Committee for the Defense of Leon Trotsky, World voices on the Moscow trials - Image 21, 1936?, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 16, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3054/show/3006.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title World voices on the Moscow trials
Alternative Title World voices on the Moscow trials: a compilation from the labor and liberal press of the world
Creator (LCNAF)
  • American Committee for the Defense of Leon Trotsky
Publisher Pioneer Publishers
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1936?
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Trotsky, Leon, 1879-1940
  • Zinovyev, Grigory Yevseyevich, 1883-1936
  • Kamenev, Lev Borisovich, 1883-1936
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Extent 64 pages: 1 illustration; 20 cm
Original Item Location DK266.3.A45
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304404~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 21
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2774257_020.jpg
Transcript band was suspected. Then I heard that an Italian boy, who had been in the State penitentiary on a felony charge and was out, had been picked up and confessed. I went to police headquarters. The third- degree room was 8 by 12, furnished by two broken chairs, an old table, some file cases. As I entered the outer room I saw a policeman leaving this room. I heard a loud outcry and entered. I saw a young man kneeling on the floor, with his hands joined and lifted, crying aloud to God to answer his prayer for help. He was saying, "You know, God, I didn't do it. I had nothing to do with it. A girl got me to say this, to help out a detective. They wouldn't believe me now. I am telling truth. I have got to go to the chair for something I didn't do." " 'I interfered, sent the detective out, and questioned the young man myself. I examined him. He had been beaten over the kidneys. On one side were three red marks, on the other one large red mark, and he was weak and in great pain, as from a body beating. He told me: "They are trying to kill me. They have made me confess to something I didn't do. I was still in prison at the time the crime was committed, and you will prove it if you will check the dates." I did so, and found the young man was telling the truth—he had actually not been released from prison at the time the woman was murdered. His story was that a girl, whom he knew, had fallen under the power of a detective, who was using her for his own purposes, and that she had, under pressure from this detective, persuaded him to confess. The essential fact was, they were torturing a man who had a singularly perfect alibi, and they knew it.' " The worthlessness, as evidence, of confessions extracted under compulsion, has been demonstrated hundreds of times. Here are a couple of illustrations from Jardine. "A German soldier charged with robbing his officer, who was tortured repeatedly in order to force him to reveal what had become of the stolen property, under torture accused himself and others of many crimes and even of murders which had never been committed." And shortly before the Revolution in 1793, the Parliament of Paris suspended two Judges from their office who had ordered the execution of a man for the alleged murder of a woman, proved only by his own confession under torture—the woman being discovered alive within two years after the execution of the supposed murderer. Torture as a legal means of extracting evidence is a part of our inheritance from ancient Rome. It was a common practice in the days of the Republic; though, as Blackstone says, "its uncertainty as a test and criterion for truth was elegantly pointed out by Tully: though he lived in a state wherein it was usual to torture slaves in order to furnish evidence: 'Nature sets a limit to what mind and body can bear; between fear of further torture and hope of release, there is no room for truth.' " And Cicero was not the only Roman writer to denounce the practice. 19