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World voices on the Moscow trials
Image 16
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American Committee for the Defense of Leon Trotsky. World voices on the Moscow trials - Image 16. 1936?. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 19, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3054/show/3001.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

American Committee for the Defense of Leon Trotsky. (1936?). World voices on the Moscow trials - Image 16. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3054/show/3001

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

American Committee for the Defense of Leon Trotsky, World voices on the Moscow trials - Image 16, 1936?, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 19, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3054/show/3001.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title World voices on the Moscow trials
Alternative Title World voices on the Moscow trials: a compilation from the labor and liberal press of the world
Creator (LCNAF)
  • American Committee for the Defense of Leon Trotsky
Publisher Pioneer Publishers
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1936?
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Trotsky, Leon, 1879-1940
  • Zinovyev, Grigory Yevseyevich, 1883-1936
  • Kamenev, Lev Borisovich, 1883-1936
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Extent 64 pages: 1 illustration; 20 cm
Original Item Location DK266.3.A45
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304404~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 16
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2774257_015.jpg
Transcript practice and a few years ago also in theory. First he arranged for special supplies of food and clothing at exceedingly low prices for all persons holding responsible positions, and raised the party maximum to a higher figure. Then when a year or so ago these "closed shops" were abolished he put an end to the party maximum altogether, and gave salaries of 1,500, 2,000, and even 3,000 roubles to the Communists who form the upper ranks of the bureaucracy. Since 300 roubles is a high wage for workers and few non-party specialists receive more than 600 or 700, and since the higher bureaucrats still enjoy their free motor-cars, country houses, special rest homes, etc., the division between rich and poor grows ever wider. In this way Stalin has created a bureaucracy with a vested interest in the continuation of his government, and moreover has made sure that no leading party members will go against his "line" however violently he outrages all the tenets of Bolshevik theory. Today the members of the Communist party have just as strong a vested interest in the present organization of Russian society as the capitalist class in other countries has in the continuation of capitalism. So long as a leading party member remains a good "yes man" he is assured of a high standard of life, a position of great authority, the best schools for his children—in a word, of all the luxuries of an aristocracy. So long as the minor party members cling firmly to the "general line of the party," that- is, Stalin's line, they have the hope of eventually obtaining all these privileges when they rise to the top of the party ladder. Those who cannot be reconciled either by chauvinistic propaganda concerning the present power and greatness of Russia or bribed by positions of power and privilege are kept from grumbling by fear for their families. There is some astonishment in England at the "confessions" of the men on trial. Although their lives may have been promised to them if they should confess it is more probable that they were mainly concerned for their families. Kamenev at least made this perfectly clear when he said in court that "although dying a criminal traitor" he hoped that his wife and three children, "whose joyous lives he had ruined," would follow the "Stalinist Communist path." Men who might have resisted in spite of long solitary confinement, constant questioning, despair, and the tricks of agents provocateurs, are brought to make abject confessions when threatened with reprisals on their wives and children. According to Soviet law the families of any Soviet citizen who escapes abroad or stays abroad are liable to ten years' imprisonment. This law refers not to accused persons but to those who dare to wish to live elsewhere than in Russia. Making a man's family suffer for his crimes is an accepted practice in Russia and explains much of what appears incomprehensible to the foreign observer. Those whose abject confessions are read in court to make a public holiday hope to save their families from 14