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World voices on the Moscow trials
Image 10
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American Committee for the Defense of Leon Trotsky. World voices on the Moscow trials - Image 10. 1936?. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 12, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3054/show/2995.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

American Committee for the Defense of Leon Trotsky. (1936?). World voices on the Moscow trials - Image 10. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3054/show/2995

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

American Committee for the Defense of Leon Trotsky, World voices on the Moscow trials - Image 10, 1936?, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 12, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/3054/show/2995.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title World voices on the Moscow trials
Alternative Title World voices on the Moscow trials: a compilation from the labor and liberal press of the world
Creator (LCNAF)
  • American Committee for the Defense of Leon Trotsky
Publisher Pioneer Publishers
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1936?
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Trotsky, Leon, 1879-1940
  • Zinovyev, Grigory Yevseyevich, 1883-1936
  • Kamenev, Lev Borisovich, 1883-1936
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Extent 64 pages: 1 illustration; 20 cm
Original Item Location DK266.3.A45
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304404~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 10
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2774257_009.jpg
Transcript who were to blame. The assassin was highly obliging, and there was built up a picture of the underground work of Zinoviev and of the existence of a "conspiratorial counter-revolutionary terrorist group" whose object was to disorganize Stalin's leadership. Trotsky did not enter directly; but it was declared, without much particularization, that the conspirators were following out his ideas. Nor were Zinoviev and Kamenev—brought out from their political obscurity— accused of more than indirect participation. It was not alleged that they gave their consent to the murder of Kirov, only, as Zinoviev said in his abject confession, that they had "moral responsibility" because their actions "could not but promote the degeneration of these rogues by the creation of a terroristic frame of mind." So Zinoviev and Kamenev were spared the supreme penalty, a recognition that they had been virtually impotent since their fall nine years before, and a concession, perhaps, to their having belonged to the "Old Guard" of Lenin's close associates. No organized conspiracy had been proved; only, at best, the existence of internal discontent, and a tendency to voice it. Now, eighteen months later, the story is retold, with new trimmings. Fresh characters appear; almost every Communist leader who has passed out of favor is held up as a potential murderer. The Latvian Consul with his five thousand roubles vanishes into the background and the Gestapo and thirteen thousand Czech crowns come in. Trotsky, the pathetic wandering exile, harried by ill-health and reluctant hosts, appears as the cunning accomplice of the German Secret Police. And, crowning infamy, a gentleman is found who intended to shoot Stalin but, happily, was given a seat rather too far away. Once again the narratives are complete, the confessions of the accused abject, their guilt handsomely acknowledged. But so also were the narratives and confessions and admissions in January, 1935. It is strange that such material parts of the story were then unknown, and still stranger that important events in it did not take place until months after the earlier trial. What kernel of truth there may actually be is hard to guess; that the Nazi Gestapo has fished in Russia's troubled waters is extremely probable, although from everything we know of Trotsky and the principal accused it is highly unlikely that they have intrigued with their country's greatest foe. Still, one supposes, the trial will go according to plan, and the death sentences for which the State-controlled Moscow press is clamoring will be pronounced. It is earnestly to be hoped that they will not be executed, that the Soviet Government will be content with its melodrama and not stain itself with what the outside world could only regard as political murder. It is well to speak plainly. Though every act of the Soviet State finds its British apologists who imagine that criticism of it springs from capitalist original sin, it needs only common sense to see that State political executions at this moment must do immense harm to Russia's credit in the world and encourage