Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
The Menshevik trial
Image 76
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
The Menshevik trial - Image 76. 1931. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2964/show/2947.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1931). The Menshevik trial - Image 76. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2964/show/2947

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Menshevik trial - Image 76, 1931, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2964/show/2947.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title The Menshevik trial
Alternative Title The Menshevik trial: the text of the indictment of the counter-revolutionary Menshevik organization
Publisher Workers Library Publishers
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1931
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Politics and government
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Rossiĭskai͡a sot͡sial-demokraticheskai͡a rabochai͡a partii͡a
Subject.Name (Local)
  • Social-Democratic Workers Party of Russia
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 88 pages; 22 cm
Original Item Location DK266.M4 1931
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304553~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 76
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_3268642_075.jpg
Transcript I met Abramovitch at the railway station as arranged, and we then journeyed to my country house in Alabino. In my house, Abramovitch declared that our desire to call ourselves Russian Central Committee was wrong, because our competence was limited to a too small circle of organisations, and that at the moment there was no chance of organising a great conference or a congress, but that there was no reason why we should not call ourselves ' the All-Union Bureau of the Central Committee of the R.S.D.L.P.' I doubted this, because I did not believe that the foreign C.C. could hand over a part of its functions and rights to a group which had been formed more or less by accident. " At the same time, Abramovitch pointed out the necessity of concentrating the main weight of the work on the groups of responsible Soviet employees. He also pointed out that these groups must be united and begin a more decisive tempo of disorganising activity. " He further pointed out the desirability of establishing closer connections with the groups active amongst the peasantry, whereby he had in mind the Party of the Working Peasants. Abramovitch also told me that, with the help of the addresses I had given him, he had met Gromann, Salkind and, apparently, also Petunin, and that a conference of our group was to be arranged, but before that he wanted to journey to a number of other towns where he still maintained his old connections. In particular, he wanted to go to White Russia and to Minsk, where, as he was well-known there, he intended to disguise himself. After this talk, Abramovitch went back to Moscow, and for safety's sake he travelled by a different line (the Alexandrov line). I placed my horse and trap at his disposal to take him to the station Golizino. The citizen Parfenov, who is the watchman at the house, drove him to the station. I went on foot to the station Alabino and journeyed back to Moscow on the Briansk line. Abramovitch intended to spend the night in Moscow with one of his acquaintances. He did not tell me with which one. Before his departure, Abramovitch promised to come again to my place in Moscow, because he had left his travelling necessities at my rooms. A few days later, Salkind telephoned me and told me that he would be at my house at a certain time. I understood from what he said that he would come together with Abramovitch. On the evening of the same day, both Abramovitch and Salkind came to my house, but separately. " The discussion which took place dealt with the same objects as the discussion at my country house. 74